Tag Archives: YouTube

Ball Street and Vauxhall launch new ‘Home Nations Football Show’

A brand-new show has launched on the Vauxhall Football TV YouTube channel, previewing the latest Home Nations fixtures.

The Vauxhall Home Nations Football Show looks ahead to England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Wales’ upcoming games in a 30-minute special.

Filmed in partnership with popular YouTube channel Ball Street, the Vauxhall Home Nations Football Show, features special guests from each Home Nation.

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Europe retain the Ryder Cup – How it played out on social media

Yesterday saw the by then expected win for Team Europe as they took their 10-6 overnight lead from Saturday and turned it into a 16 1/2 – 11 1/2 win.

Over the course of the week, the buzz was building for the Gleneagles based tournament as the best players from the US and Europe went head-to-head.

But there were also big things happening away from the main play, as organisers looked to make it the most digital golf event ever.  With 3 main Twitter accounts being the ones to follow, with @rydercup, @rydercupEUROPE and @rydercupUSA. The event is also great in the fact that so many of players are very active on social media, especially Twitter. Giving fans great insights into what goes on behind the scenes.

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Juventus Asian / Pacific Tour , Backstage video Andrea Pirlo is not impressed

Juventus nail it with #PirloIsNotImpressed

Juventus have been making great strides and been amongst the pioneers in digital amongst Serie A teams. And it’s latest idea, #PirloIsNotImpressed, has seen great global success since its launch on 22 August.

Shot during our recent summer tour in Sydney, the entertaining skit features Juventus and Italy star Andrea Pirlo judging four acts who seek to impress him with their respective performances.

Famed for his dead-pan expression, Pirlo is unmoved by what he sees before the challenge is then passed over to the online community, who are encouraged to try and win him over by sending in their own attempts.

In less than 10 days, the video has registered over 1.5 million views, 850k on YouTube and 700k on Facebook, and the hashtag has commanded a reach of over 20 million (figures provided by Juventus FC). At its peak, the #PirloIsNotImpressed hashtag was used almost 3,000 times in one day.

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In addition, #PirloIsNotImpressed has also been adopted by thousands of users in discussions unrelated to the world of football.

This engaging initiative continues to proceed and, after several Twitter replies along the lines of “nice try but better luck next time”, users remain eager to see if  anything is capable of winning Pirlo’s approval.

We wait to see how the club choose to extend the campaign but it’s one that shows the success in testing an idea and letting it grow organically. It is now something that could go on for a long time with its own cult following.

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#CoolJob: Audience Development Researcher – FullTimeDEVILS

JOB TITLE:

Audience Development Researcher – FullTimeDEVILS

 

CONTRACT:

ASAP – Dec (possibly permanent)

 

JOB ROLE:

– to grow the FullTimeDEVILS audience by building relationships on YouTube, other social media platforms, football websites and mainstream media

– to maintain and optimise the FullTimeDEVILS YouTube channel

– management of the FullTimeDEVILS accounts on various social media platforms

– generating editorial ideas and assisting team with video production

 

KEY REQUIREMENTS/SKILLS

– an avid Manchester United fan with knowledge of the club, community and local area

– working knowledge of YouTube and social media platforms

– confident short form writing/blogging ability

– working knowledge of video production techniques

– self-starter; willing to create and maximise opportunities for the channel

– applicants should be comfortable in a football environment

– ability to work under pressure and in a fast-turnaround/news environment

 

ADDITIONAL SKILLS (DESIRABLE)

– good contact list within football blogging community

– video editing experience (Final Cut, Adobe Premiere)

– basic video shooting skills

– basic image editing (Photoshop, After Effects)

– website SEO experience

– on-camera vlogging/presenting experience

 

LOCATION

London/Manchester – travel will be required

 

SALARY

TBC

 

Please send your covering letter and CV into Neil Smythe on neil@resolutionsquare.com

 

Is Sponsorship being devalued by Social Media?

Guest Post: Tom Kelk is a tech/sport blogger and Senior Social Exec at communications agency, Pitch. You can find him on Twitter (@TomKelk)

This is the first World Cup where brands have heavily activated around the tournament through digital channels – when they have no sponsored right to do so. Since South Africa 2010, Facebook has more than doubled its monthly active users, Twitter users now send more than 10x as many tweets per day and now Instagram exists!

The social media landscape has been transformed in four years, and gives an indication to why brands are putting the effort into activating around Brazil 2014. Surely all this chatter around an event is a dream come true for the official sponsors? It’s not quite that simple.

In a recent study by Unruly Media, only four of the top 11 most viewed brand ads about the World Cup were from sponsors. Less than half. Continental Tyres – one of the leading official sponsors, didn’t feature at all. Sony – an official partner, are nowhere to be seen.

Unruly Media Braziliant Brand Tracker

Unsurprisingly, Nike use their assets and force the relation in the minds of consumers. All the Nike-sponsored teams and players were involved in their heavy-cost ad that implies they are official sponsors – but they’re not.  If you did a poll, how many would say Nike were a main World Cup sponsor?

Beats have come out trumps from this World Cup through an impressive ad utilising their playing assets. Again, no ‘right’ to have a World Cup conversation but used World Cup players to enable the link with the consumer.

Obviously the study isn’t flawless, but it does continue to highlight an interesting question. In the digital age, is there still the same value in being an official sponsor?

To answer the question, it’s worth dissecting a sponsorship package to understand where the value still lies, and where better to look, than FIFA.

FIFA state that a sponsor benefits from: “Wide product category exclusivity which is afforded to all Commercial Affiliates, allowing each brand to distinguish themselves from competing brands in their product category.” Now, whilst this has been aggressively reinforced in and around the stadiums, this is far from true in a digital space. To start with, look at the table above. Nike above adidas, Samsung above Sony and Nissan above Hyundai. Not looking that distinguished from competitors there… What about beer brands? Budweiser, official sponsor, have activated heavily around the World Cup:

But has that stopped Newcastle Brown Ale benefitting from the platform? Not one bit.

Another key benefit outlined by FIFA, is “offering a unique platform vis-à-vis their competitors.” This point is the crux of the debate. I would argue that this platform has disintegrated in recent years. Social media has enabled brands without the official connection to ambush these ‘unique platforms’.You only have to consider the Suarez incident.

There was a clamour for attention from brands off the back of the biting incident, but how many were official? The only one that springs to mind, was the Uruguayan Mcdonald’s Twitter account, which was more than likely not signed off in the higher echelons of Mcdonald’s as FIFA would absolutely frown upon sponsors discussing the incident!

Aside from the conversation, what else do FIFA sponsors have the ‘right’ to use? They can use official tournament title and logos – but is it beneficial, or is that in fact a hindrance? When using social media, audiences have developed an eye for official titling, and have almost developed an instinctive filter to those posts. Besides, as seen with the Snickers tweet above, who needs to reference the World Cup when over 5,000 tweets per second are being sent? Everyone knows what you’re talking about. In fact, could we go further and ask whether it could be better to work unofficially?

So, taking all this into account, does the traditional sponsorship model need altering to include further digital rights and should sponsors be negotiating harder to get this cover? Surely when their competitors begin to be more prominent in discussions over the World Cup, for example, surely they have a right to question costs?

Perhaps the new ideal ‘bigger brand’ model will follow the likes of Nike and Beats who find themselves less restricted by buying direct player assets and activate on an unofficial basis.Bigger brands will increasingly explore these opportunities in a creative capacity to give them the right to participate more heavily in these conversations. As for the smaller brands, they’ll continue to jump in and out when there’s a product link, and get small wins when they can.

There’s obviously still value in sponsorship. Access to assets like players and visible advertising rights are ultimately beneficial. However, social media allows a conversation to be had by brands when they couldn’t do so before without treading on toes and this is where sponsors need to be tougher on their sponsorships to maximise the value they receive on a digital platform, as well as a physical.

This is a topic that a dissertation could focus upon, and I’ve just brushed the surface here, but what do you think? Is the value of a sponsorship still the same and how has it been affected by the rise of social media? What should brands do to fight competitors on both platforms?

 

adidas launch live World Cup YouTube show, ‘The Dugout’

The picture is becoming clearer from one of the biggest sponsors of FIFA, who recently extended their deal until 2030, after the release of their recent TV ad… and now news of a brand new YouTube series. It presents a major shift for the sports brand as they go directly after World Cup broadcasters, stating that “the traditional press conference is no more..”!

The global sports manufactorer is going to be broadcasting live from Rio a series of exclusive programmes on the platform starting from the first day of the World Cup, June 12th. It’s a very similar move to that of Hyundai UK who teamed up with YouTube backed football channel Copa90 earlier in the year, though with a different emphasis. adidas have got together with Kick TV, the US equivalents of Copa90, which is part of MLS Digital for this one.

It will be hosted by Jimmy Conrad, Layla Anne-Lee and Hugh Wizzy and give fans the opportunity to take part in a virtual press conference incorporating live interviews with the likes of Cafu, Kaka and Lucas Moura, adidas product reviews, behind-the-scenes action with adidas sponsored teams and chances to win prizes.

It’s another part of the adidas sponsorship plan that has been over 2 years in the making. London-based social media agency We Are Social will have been closely involved in the strategy and will I’m sure be on-site working long shifts to make this the best campaign ever.

Senior PR Manager (adidas Football), Rob Hughes, someone I knew well from my time at WAS (disclosure: I used to work on the adidas account at WAS), has said;

“The Dugout is a very exciting concept for Adidas, bringing together the best of Adidas talent with the reach of YouTube. The broadcasts will allow all football fans around the world to participate in the global conversation surrounding the Fifa World Cup. This youth-magazine-style football show will be fans’ inside view into the tournament, showcasing Brazil at its best with many famous faces and will be a must-watch throughout the competition,”

The first show is being aired at 2.00pm BST (10.00am BRT) and there will be 6 in total as part of the #AllInOrNothing campaign that has been intriguing commentators around the world since its launch. The final show will be on the eve of the World Cup Final. You’ll be able to watch it on the adidas Football YouTube page at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uuAPWG5e8lQ&feature=share

“The streaming of live adidas shows from Brazil is a unique brand proposition and a great example of a strategic partnership creating new, engaging and innovative content to a relevant audience. Our partnership with adidas has already seen us work together on many elements of their World Cup campaign, and these broadcasts will position adidas and YouTube at the heart of the conversation around this summer’s tournament. We are delighted that the World Cup’s number one partner, adidas, has chosen YouTube to play such a central role in their World Cup campaign.” – Lucas Watson, VP, Global Brand Solutions at YouTube.

It’s another different approach we’ve seen in recent weeks, but not so different from what Hyundai have put together. It is is though an example of a brand directly taking on traditional broadcasters as they make use of their access to players, coaches and other World Cup content. They’re also working with an already established YouTube channel in Kick TV and thus will be tapping into their audience. The start of a new trend?

Add to that the expected big spend using YouTube TrueView and they’re be looking to get the attention of every football fan out there. I also expect to see and really tight and well executed social media plan that will bring others into the conversation.

Will you be tuning in?

 

Real Madrid – Champions of Europe…and YouTube

Our friends at Real Madrid, who I have to say I’ve been a fan of since the days of Zinedine Zidane, are not only celebrating ‘La Decima’ but can hold up the trophy for being the kings of YouTube as well.

This info comes from OpenSlate, a YouTube analytics firm that bases its ranking on the number of views creators generate on YouTube, how consistently they deliver an audience, how often people share and comment on these videos. The company rolls all that data up into a “SlateScore” while also ranking each channel on a scale of one to 10 for Engagement, Consistency and Influence.

Real Madrid enjoy almost double the amount of monthly views of their videos than nearest rival, both in footballing and digital terms, FC Barcelona. What makes that interesting is the FC Barcelona has marginally more subscribers but a lot less views. Some work to do on the quality of their content? or just an unsuccessful year by their own high standards maybe. Just below these two footballing giants are two YouTube funded channels.

Copa90 is number 4, a channel I had the pleasure of working for at the start of 2013. They have gone from 30,000 subscribers to almost 700,000 in the last 18 months and work with the likes of Hyundai UK around the upcoming World Cup.  Kick TV is the MLS run channel that has a similar feel to Copa90 but also shows live USA international games and has access to more ‘stars’ than its European counterpart.

According to the Wall Street Journal article this chart first appeared in, just outside the Top 6 that are shown below are Nike Football and adidas Football, both of whom will be looking to do better with massive World Cup campaigns now well under way. Being a brand, it’s still hard for either to be viewed by fans as a true source of football entertainment as a mix of boot/kit launch video and TV ads make up the majority of the content.

Check out the full ranking here:

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Ball Street and Papa Johns give fans a slice of the action for the run in

This is the most exciting climax to a football season in years.  With so much still to play for, Ball Street and Papa John’s have teamed up to guide fans through the run in with a weekly digital football show — 451.   Like any good football underdog story, Ball Street are going up against opponents with bigger budgets, all while entertaining fans up and down the country.

The 451 show delivered by Papa John’s, the official partner of the Football League covers all four leagues and features a mix of passionate fans and footballing insiders such as Ian Wright, Clinton Morrison and the Football Ramble’s Marcus Speller.

451 is a free weekly show, starting on 17th April until the end of the season and will be available on www.ballstreet.co.uk and syndicated to leading football sites including Caught Offside and Football Fancast.

“Everything these days is about the Premier League but we know there are clubs and fans out there that outside of the top teams that deserve the same kind of treatment,” said Wright, who started his career at Crystal Palace.

Matt Wilson (co-founder of Ball Street) said, “We are a delighted to work with a sponsor who not only a sponsor the Football League, but want to do something meaningful for its fans.  The 451 show is the only place where Luis Suarez and Lee Tomlin will get equal billing”

Speaking about 451 Andrew Gallagher, senior director of marketing for Papa John’s, said: “We very excited to be working with Ball Street to produce 451. We know that from our sponsorship of the Football League how passionate football fans, and our customers, are about the national game.

“Papa John’s is proud to be supporting a show that will give all fans a voice as we reach the sharp end of the season. Ball Street has lined up an incredible team to present the show, and we can’t wait for kick off to see Ian Wright, Matt Holland and a host of other star names in action when 451 goes live.”

Ball Street 451 show trailer….

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