Tag Archives: technology

How technology has changed on the UK sports media industry forever

Recently I was invited to write an article on the Vodafone small business blog “Your Better Business”, which I was delighted to accept. The objective of the article was to give an overview of how the sports media industry has been transformed by changes in technology and what the future holds for the industry. Below is my summary and you can see the original here, love to hear if you agree….

Widely available internet access has enabled anyone’s voice to be heard, and on a scale never imaginable of before. I’ve been blogging on sport and the impact of digital media on it for the last five years and it’s only the ready availability of free websites like WordPress, cheap hosting and social media to promote articles and research new ones that has really made it possible.

The impact that technology has had on sport and how it is reported, whether it’s on certain niches such as digital and sport or more general discussions around teams and leagues around the world, has been huge. Previously you could say that sport needed the media, almost on an unconditional basis. But the boot is now firmly on the other foot so to speak.

Marc Cooper, until recently the Head of Audience and Content at The Football League, gave some insight into how the relationship between fans, the media and football teams has changed;

“Football clubs have always been able to give fans certain things that other media can’t, which is information and confirmation. Fans may have read about their team being linked with certain players, and they’ll look to their club website to confirm it. But fans want more than that. They want to be entertained too, and they want to know more about the players at their club. That’s another area that clubs can serve the fans well.”

It’s not only the major sports that have reaped the benefits of being in a more connected world. The so-­‐called ‘lesser known sports’ can now act as their own media company, not having to rely on the scraps available within mainstream publications. This really is a game changer for them and will help raise awareness for their sport and get people interested in playing and/or watching it.

So where does that leave the journalist? The truth is that this has been the most radical shift in the media business in generations. And as with all periods of change there will be a time of adjustment as the old slowly learns how to work with and make use of the new.

The journalist is now the independent trusted resource, the one who has used his/her contacts and found out what is actually happening, not just the rumours (most of the time). They can spend time putting together great analysis and speak directly to the players involved. They are now the authentication, the experts we turn to when in doubt.

The relationship between fans and the media will continue to evolve as technology provides even greater access and insight. Fans will undoubtedly be the winners as the media they consume revolves more around when and where they want to do so.

Geo targeting of information is becoming more refined, helping to merge the online and offline worlds. We will see teams and leagues take back more control of their media, relying less on media rights as they produce their own income from subscriptions, sponsorship and advertising. Until those rights packages that are sold now become unsustainable, or Apple or Google bid for them, then this will take more time to see any radical shifts in live sports especially.

We are still in the early days of this explosion in media and technology, the tip of the iceberg in fact. But what it safe to say is that for media companies to stay relevant there needs to be a change in the mind sets of those involved. To become more fan-centric and deliver the types of content when they want it and how they want it.

The speed of change we are seeing now is frightening at times but this also means that new opportunities are opening up everyday. These gaps in the market are there to be seized upon by whoever is brave and forward thinking enough to spot them. There’s never been a more exciting time to be working in this industry than now!

– See more at: http://yourbetterbusiness.co.uk/the-symbiosis-of-media-and-sport/#sthash.VpXEOHMg.dpuf

Grabyo lands $2m funding from sports stars Thierry Henry, Cesc Fabregas, Robin van Persie and Tony Parker

Grabyo, the global leader in real-time video, today announced raising $2m in funding from an array of major sports stars on the back of accelerating customer demand, ongoing momentum in social video and the rapid growth of mobile video advertising. The investors and global ambassadors include Premier League Football stars Cesc Fabregas and Robin van Persie, New York Red Bulls star Thierry Henry and current NBA champion Tony Parker.

Continue reading

The current status of digital transformation within football at IFA Berlin

Guest Post: Benjamin Stoll founded Digithalamus, a consultancy for digital strategies and solutions, in October 2014 in Berlin. He has worked with a focus on digital and sports for about ten years, helping brands, clubs and organizations with digital solutions, e.g. with Ledavi, GMR Marketing, Serviceplan and sport1. In 2011 he founded the missing piece as a digital engagement marketing agency.

 

What’s the secret of Ronaldo’s social media domination? How to make profits from social media as a football club? What should sports journalism in the age of digital media should look like? Those and other issues driven by digitalisation were tackled by an international football audience at IFA Conference Berlin on 30th of October.

Continue reading

MANCHESTER CITY LAUNCH CITYMATCHDAY – THE WORLD’S MOST IMMERSIVE SECOND SCREEN APP

Barclays Premier League Champions, Manchester City have become the first Premier League Club to launch a dedicated second screen matchday app with live video replay technology.

Launched ahead of City’s upcoming derby clash with Manchester United which is set to be viewed by millions around the world, the new app is packed with exciting and innovative features.

Continue reading

Connecting Your Audience to the Sport

Guest Post: David Johnson is Commercial Director at Skylab. David has vast experience as a digital video content strategist, and as a broadcast manager for the 2004 Olympic Games, two FIFA World Cups, two UEFA Euros, and a UEFA Champions League Final. He is also an award-winning creative director/producer.

How many people walk through the doors to a sports venue each time there’s a major event, is it hundreds? Thousands? Tens of thousands, perhaps? The possibility of connecting with each  and every of them and deliver tailor made content directly to them has never been more real thanks to the continually and rapidly developing digital landscape.

Continue reading

Harnessing the Power of Mobile to Provide the Ultimate Fan Experience

Guest Post: David Johnson is the Commercial Director at Skylab, who has vast experience as a digital video content strategist, and as a broadcast manager for the 2004 Olympic Games, two FIFA World Cups, two UEFA Euros, and a UEFA Champions League Final. He is also an award-winning creative director/producer.

There is an increasing appetite for media-rich experiences delivered on mobile devices, with 5.6 billion mobile devices estimated to be in use by 2015 globally, and the trend will continue at an increasingly rapid rate accompanied by a projected increase of over 2,600 per cent in mobile data transfers.

Continue reading

The revolution will be broadcast in 6-seconds

This is a guest post by Luca Massaro, Managing Director of We Play. We Play are a digital sports agency that specialise in commercialising the relationship between brands and sports fans.

Owned by Twitter and released less than two years ago, mobile storytelling platform Vine has so far been one of the great success stories of the social media revolution. Its rise has been meteoric in that time and few – if any – Internet users will not have stopped to watch one of the platform’s 1 billion daily loops. Suffice to say, Vine has changed the way marketing teams think of the medium of video.

Continue reading

RFID DRIVES SOCIAL INTERACTION AT THE RYDER CUP

An update from this years event…

The introduction of Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) at this year’s Ryder Cup has proved a huge success with almost 45,000 interactions across the six day tournament, 23-28 September.

  • 46% of visitors pre-registered wristbands
  • 44,527 total interactions
  • 33 RFID social media touch points located across the course
  • Seven different activations to take part in, including BMW, Standard Life Investments and Sky Sports activations
  • 59,176 email accounts linked to wristbands
  • 44% of people who took part were aged 45-65
  • 5,818 miles walked by visitors on the ‘Walk the Course’ activation

Continue reading

Europe retain the Ryder Cup – How it played out on social media

Yesterday saw the by then expected win for Team Europe as they took their 10-6 overnight lead from Saturday and turned it into a 16 1/2 – 11 1/2 win.

Over the course of the week, the buzz was building for the Gleneagles based tournament as the best players from the US and Europe went head-to-head.

But there were also big things happening away from the main play, as organisers looked to make it the most digital golf event ever.  With 3 main Twitter accounts being the ones to follow, with @rydercup, @rydercupEUROPE and @rydercupUSA. The event is also great in the fact that so many of players are very active on social media, especially Twitter. Giving fans great insights into what goes on behind the scenes.

Continue reading