Tag Archives: technology

Europe retain the Ryder Cup – How it played out on social media

Yesterday saw the by then expected win for Team Europe as they took their 10-6 overnight lead from Saturday and turned it into a 16 1/2 – 11 1/2 win.

Over the course of the week, the buzz was building for the Gleneagles based tournament as the best players from the US and Europe went head-to-head.

But there were also big things happening away from the main play, as organisers looked to make it the most digital golf event ever.  With 3 main Twitter accounts being the ones to follow, with @rydercup, @rydercupEUROPE and @rydercupUSA. The event is also great in the fact that so many of players are very active on social media, especially Twitter. Giving fans great insights into what goes on behind the scenes.

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RFID Digital Activations Will Give Ryder Cup Fans Best Experience Ever

Tomorrow sees the start of one of the most anticipated sports events of the year, the Ryder Cup.  Where the best talent from Europe take on the might of the US on the PGA Centenary Course at Gleneagles, Scotland in the ultimate team golf tournament.

But away from what the players are doing on the course there will be plenty happening to give fans more information, entertainment and interaction than ever before. Earlier in the summer we spoke to the R&A’s Kevin Bain about their plans for the British Open, this event takes it onto the next level for fan engagement.

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Wearables

How will wearable technology impact social marketing for sports brands?

Saf Hossain is a Social Media Manager at We Play. We Play is a London-based sports social media agency helping brands commercialise their relationship with fans.

In an announcement that surprised very few people last week, Cupertino’s finest revealed the first ever Apple Watch. Many commentators are predicting that, like mp3 players, smartphones and tablets, Apple’s arrival into the smartwatch market provides wearable technology with mainstream appeal and long-term staying power.

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The Sports Technology Awards – Celebrating the Sector’s Cutting Edge

Even the most casual of sports fan cannot fail to have noticed the increasing influence technology has on sport and for people at the sharp end of the industry, this influence is even more significant.

The coaches, referees, broadcasters and athletes who are immersed daily in sport, prosper hugely from technology’s offerings and so it’s only right that the people behind the innovations are justly recognized.

In a year that has seen a World Cup, an Olympics, a Commonwealth Games and a Ryder Cup as well as the launch of new initiatives such as Formula E, there have been some stand-out uses of technology. The introduction of goal line technology at the World Cup finals caused headlines before the tournament, whilst vanishing foam captured audiences’ attention during the contest.

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Wimbledon generated 3.5m short clip video views across Facebook and Twitter

The AELTC has announced that they shared more than 300 short clips across Facebook and Twitter during the tournament, generating over 3.5m clip plays using Grabyo’s video platform.

Facebook saw the largest number of Wimbledon clip plays with over 1.5m views (42.9%), while 1.4m (40.6%) were on Twitter and nearly 600k (16.4%) were viewed within the Wimbledon.com based video gallery powered by Grabyo.

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Why Vine is becoming a nightmare for the Premier League

Guest Post: Tom Kelk is a tech/sport blogger and Senior Social Exec at communications agency, Pitch. You can find him on Twitter (@TomKelk), LinkedIn and his blog

It arrived with quite a media force, “Premier League set to clamp down on unofficial Vine videos of goals as they get tough on copyright laws” announced the Independent, who were amongst a number of leading publications to debate the issue. We knew it was coming. It had to. Rights holders weren’t just going to sit-by and let it happen.

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A Timeline of Technology in Sport

GUEST POST: Joe Struggles is a freelance writer and Content Marketing Executive working on behalf of Farnell.

After enjoying a lengthy summer of sport, with the World Cup, Wimbledon, the Commonwealth Games and the imminent opening weekend of the English Premier League, it’s quite clear sport has come a long way since using jumpers for goalposts and shirts or skins for sides.

A somewhat of a sporting Svengali for progress came from France’s No. 10 Karim Benzema in Brazil, who broke Honduran hearts after aiding in the first-ever goal to be awarded at a major tournament using Goal-line Technology. Not only did this refuel the debate over whether technology is helping or hindering sport, but it raised questions over whether to blow the whistle on game gadgetry after taking it too far.

Taking a glance at cricket, particularly at when English rose Stuart Broad failed to walk after an apparent edge against the Aussies at the 2013 Ashes, there have been conflicting opinions on the reliability of Hot Spot, which, despite being implemented since 2006, was withdrawn from play after the tournament. Nowadays, the ever-reliant Hawk Eye backs the Snickometer at the crease, but for how long until another teammate walks?

On the defending team there are a string of sports where technology is seen as a saviour, such as the case of Hawk Eye in tennis – as we’re sure John McEnroe will probably agree. Wide-eyed empires, once subjected to endless scrutiny after making almost inhuman split-second decisions, were saved by accurate, indisputable results and the game still benefits today.

As with many aspects of sport, the introduction of newer, more advanced technologies must be tweaked, tuned and trained with trial and error. However with so many technologies being brought in and shipped out, this handy visualisation from http://uk.farnell.com/ is a great way of keeping on top of these technological transfers, including those with potential after some one-to-one management or those who should hang up their boots for the good of the game.

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New club app from Football League the answer to match-day internet access?

Last year a project called Digital Stadium was being tested in a collaboration between the University of Sussex, Brighton & Hove Albion FC and Corridor Design which looked at how modern smartphone apps can be used to build new ways of communicating within stadiums.

Currently the ideal of making stadiums ‘fully connected’ comes at a huge expense. Only the likes of Manchester City, Celtic, Rangers, Liverpool (in one stand) and other teams in the US and Europe have invested in such projects which can cost £1m+. With many stadiums starting the creak with age its not something as easy as many might think to set up.

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wimbledon social

Wimbledon 2014: A Digital Review

At the last Digital Sport London event we were lucky enough to have with us Wimbledon’s Content & Communication Manager Alexandra Willis. Alexandra spoke last year at our half day London event so it was interesting to hear their plans for this year and how they turned out.

Just before this years Championship I interviewed Alexandra for the website to get some early insights into what they had in store for us (you can read the full interview here) and the interest in what they were doing was obvious from the attention the article received. So an audience of around 70 people listened intently to what Alex had to say on stage at Riley’s Sports Bar.

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City’s fan engagement loud and clear with social media voice messaging service

Barclays Premier League Champions, Manchester City, have expanded their global social media presence by joining the leading voice messaging service, Bubbly.

With over forty million subscribers around the world, Bubbly allows users to create their own 90 second voice blog, or listen to voice recordings from a host of celebrities from the world of film, sports, comedy and music.

Users can also add a photograph with 140 characters of text, and share their favourite posts with their Facebook friends and Twitter followers.

Based in Singapore and designed primarily to cater for the 4 billion consumers in emerging Asian markets that still use feature phones, the service has seen rapid growth since its launch in 2011.

As part of the new Manchester City Bubbly account, the Club will release exclusive voice recordings from City stars such as Sergio Aguero, Joe Hart, Vincent Kompany and Samir Nasri.

Players will also record interviews in their native languages, including French, German, Portuguese, Spanish and Serbo-Croatian in order to engage with City’s multi-lingual global fan base.

From post-match interviews to Club features, the voice messages will give fans an insight into what goes on behind the scenes at their favourite club.

Commenting on the new Bubbly account, Diego Gigliani, Director of Marketing, Media and Fan Development for Manchester City, said:

“As the Club continues to attract fans from across the world and our global community grows, we will constantly seek out new and engaging ways to connect with supporters, particularly through the use of popular social media platforms, like Bubbly.

“Whether it’s through pre and post-match interviews on the pitch, or getting to know their favorite players off it, Bubbly will enable the Club to have more frequent, short-form touch-points with our fans across the world, bringing them closer to the club and helping to build deeper relationships.”

This sentiment was shared by Bubbly CEO, Thomas Clayton, who added:

“We’re ecstatic that Manchester City has chosen to connect with their fans using their real voices on Bubbly.  With the new season just around the corner, it’s a fun time to check out what these guys have to say about what’s ahead.”

Manchester City fans and followers, can access exclusive content online by visiting www.bubbly.net/MCFC, by downloading the Bubbly app on their smart phones, or by using the access codes for their feature phones.”