Tag Archive | "social media"

Arsenal breaks 4m fans to become 3rd most followed sports team on Twitter


Over the last 12 months Arsenal have seen a rise in follower numbers on Twitter launch from 2.2m to just over 4m.

This makes them the third most followed sports team in the world – and you’ve probably guessed who the top two are…. FC Barcelona (12m) and Real Madrid (11.7m).

Much of this growth has been down to varied content that keeps the fans both informed and entertained. They do the usual club news, team information on match days, competitions and behind-the-scenes peeks that we all love.

But they have also pushed the boat out with regular Q&A’s, infographics and “live-tweeting” a replay of the 1989 title decider against Liverpool at Anfield. Celebrating its 25th anniversary.

They also have dedicated Twitter accounts that cover North America, Indonesia, Vietnam and Japan. As well as having a Spanish language feed that covers several countries.

“We are proud to be the first Premier League team to reach four million Twitter followers. We are fortunate to enjoy fantastic support right around the world and social media has proven a brilliant way of engaging with our fans, wherever they are.

Last season we led successful Twitter campaigns around key events such as the signing of Mesut Ozil, the FA Cup final victory and the subsequent parade – where we tweeted video from the top of the bus. We even got Arsène Wenger to do a Twitter Takeover for the first time. With the new season fast approaching, we’ll be looking to introduce more innovations in the months to come.” – Richard Clarke, Managing Editor @ Arsenal Media Group

wenger twitter

 

 

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Formula E launches, complete with social media ‘Fanboost’ feature


Guest Post: Tom Kelk is a tech/sport blogger and Senior Social Exec at communications agency, Pitch. You can find him on Twitter (@TomKelk)

Formula E? Ring any bells? Well it will do – very soon. The Formula Electric series sparks off in Beijing in September and takes off around the world to destinations including Long Beach, LA, Punta del Esta and it finishes in Battersea Park, London.

It features global brands such a Virgin Racing, Audi, Amlin and more. Drivers like Jaime Alguersuari, Sam Bird, Bruno Senna and Lucas De Grassi are all taking part.

There’s much to be excited about the series – it’s street racing, it’s cutting-edge technology and it’s largely a step into the unknown. For us social media and digital geeks though, Formula E has opened something very exciting today and its called ‘Fanboost’.

During a Formula E race, each driver will get three ‘boosts’ that increase the power output of the car from 133kw to 200kw – certainly enough for an overtake. But here’s where it gets interesting. Fans can vote online for their favourite drivers, and the three drivers with the most votes receive one further 2.5 second boost. This means that fans can have a direct influence on the outcome of a race, which is hugely forward-thinking.

So how do users vote? Fans can vote at http://fanboost.fiaformulae.com from today as well as the Official Formula E Facebook, Twitter and SinaWeibo pages and via the official Formula E app, which launches on September 1.The three winners will be announced just 20 minutes before the start of the race.

Exciting concept and one that is sure to help the series take off! What do you think of the idea?

(*Disclosure: Tom works at Pitch Communications who work with Virgin Racing FE on the Formula E series.)

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Is Sponsorship being devalued by Social Media?


Guest Post: Tom Kelk is a tech/sport blogger and Senior Social Exec at communications agency, Pitch. You can find him on Twitter (@TomKelk)

This is the first World Cup where brands have heavily activated around the tournament through digital channels – when they have no sponsored right to do so. Since South Africa 2010, Facebook has more than doubled its monthly active users, Twitter users now send more than 10x as many tweets per day and now Instagram exists!

The social media landscape has been transformed in four years, and gives an indication to why brands are putting the effort into activating around Brazil 2014. Surely all this chatter around an event is a dream come true for the official sponsors? It’s not quite that simple.

In a recent study by Unruly Media, only four of the top 11 most viewed brand ads about the World Cup were from sponsors. Less than half. Continental Tyres – one of the leading official sponsors, didn’t feature at all. Sony – an official partner, are nowhere to be seen.

Unruly Media Braziliant Brand Tracker

Unsurprisingly, Nike use their assets and force the relation in the minds of consumers. All the Nike-sponsored teams and players were involved in their heavy-cost ad that implies they are official sponsors – but they’re not.  If you did a poll, how many would say Nike were a main World Cup sponsor?

Beats have come out trumps from this World Cup through an impressive ad utilising their playing assets. Again, no ‘right’ to have a World Cup conversation but used World Cup players to enable the link with the consumer.

Obviously the study isn’t flawless, but it does continue to highlight an interesting question. In the digital age, is there still the same value in being an official sponsor?

To answer the question, it’s worth dissecting a sponsorship package to understand where the value still lies, and where better to look, than FIFA.

FIFA state that a sponsor benefits from: “Wide product category exclusivity which is afforded to all Commercial Affiliates, allowing each brand to distinguish themselves from competing brands in their product category.” Now, whilst this has been aggressively reinforced in and around the stadiums, this is far from true in a digital space. To start with, look at the table above. Nike above adidas, Samsung above Sony and Nissan above Hyundai. Not looking that distinguished from competitors there… What about beer brands? Budweiser, official sponsor, have activated heavily around the World Cup:

But has that stopped Newcastle Brown Ale benefitting from the platform? Not one bit.

Another key benefit outlined by FIFA, is “offering a unique platform vis-à-vis their competitors.” This point is the crux of the debate. I would argue that this platform has disintegrated in recent years. Social media has enabled brands without the official connection to ambush these ‘unique platforms’.You only have to consider the Suarez incident.

There was a clamour for attention from brands off the back of the biting incident, but how many were official? The only one that springs to mind, was the Uruguayan Mcdonald’s Twitter account, which was more than likely not signed off in the higher echelons of Mcdonald’s as FIFA would absolutely frown upon sponsors discussing the incident!

Aside from the conversation, what else do FIFA sponsors have the ‘right’ to use? They can use official tournament title and logos – but is it beneficial, or is that in fact a hindrance? When using social media, audiences have developed an eye for official titling, and have almost developed an instinctive filter to those posts. Besides, as seen with the Snickers tweet above, who needs to reference the World Cup when over 5,000 tweets per second are being sent? Everyone knows what you’re talking about. In fact, could we go further and ask whether it could be better to work unofficially?

So, taking all this into account, does the traditional sponsorship model need altering to include further digital rights and should sponsors be negotiating harder to get this cover? Surely when their competitors begin to be more prominent in discussions over the World Cup, for example, surely they have a right to question costs?

Perhaps the new ideal ‘bigger brand’ model will follow the likes of Nike and Beats who find themselves less restricted by buying direct player assets and activate on an unofficial basis.Bigger brands will increasingly explore these opportunities in a creative capacity to give them the right to participate more heavily in these conversations. As for the smaller brands, they’ll continue to jump in and out when there’s a product link, and get small wins when they can.

There’s obviously still value in sponsorship. Access to assets like players and visible advertising rights are ultimately beneficial. However, social media allows a conversation to be had by brands when they couldn’t do so before without treading on toes and this is where sponsors need to be tougher on their sponsorships to maximise the value they receive on a digital platform, as well as a physical.

This is a topic that a dissertation could focus upon, and I’ve just brushed the surface here, but what do you think? Is the value of a sponsorship still the same and how has it been affected by the rise of social media? What should brands do to fight competitors on both platforms?

 

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Team GB launch interactive Pinterest Map showing history at the Olympic Games


Today, Team GB have launched an interactive Pinterest Map which looks at its entire history at the Olympic Games. In a really attractive looking activation they have come up with something that will fascinate fans in a really interactive way.

From Launceston Elliot in Athens 1896 to the men’s curling Silver at Sochi 2014 and all the medals won in-between, you can take a trip around the world and relive Team GB’s Olympic History: http://www.pinterest.com/teamgb/team-gbs-olympic-history/

The interactive map also features medal successes, Olympic Games logos and other top Team GB moments covering every Olympic Games from 1896 to 2014.  Pinterest forms part of Team GB’s social media strategy on the road to Rio 2016 as Team GB aim to engage with new audiences and fans.

Over the coming weeks Team GB will also roll out the historical timeline on its Facebook page, with one winter and summer Olympic Game being released each day. The timeline will feature as Facebook milestones and a photo album full of Team GB moments, stadium pictures and medal tallies.

When I recently ran a recent event looking at the World Cup in London, I asked Alex at FIFA if he had a question for the panel over Twitter. He asked what they thought FIFA could do better and more of, and the response was to utilise their massive World Cup archive.

That is just what Team GB are doing here and are using both Pinterest and Facebook to do this. Two of the most visual platforms out there, to bring their digital archive to life.

teamgbpinterest  pinterest-IG

 

 

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NBA and Google team up to bring fans Google Hangouts live during the NBA Draft


With the NBA season over, ending in dramatic fashion as underdogs San Antonio Spurs overcame LeBron James’ Miami Heat to take the NBA Championship in Game 5 of the NBA Finals, attention turns for every basketball fan to the NBA Draft.

Considered to be the most exciting draft since 1984, the year that the NBA welcomed Michael Jordan, Charles Barkley, John Stockton and first-pick Hakeem Olajuwon, 2014 is set to bring future legends into the league. To capitalise on this, the NBA are giving greater access to their fans, allowing them the opportunity to speak live with the top draft picks using Google+ Hangouts just moments after the players have been selected.

Giving fans exclusive access to some of the most exciting draft prospects in years – for basketball fans: Andrew Wiggins, Jabari Parker, Dante Exum, Aaron Gordon and Marcus Smart to name a few –is another step in showcasing the leading digital innovation of the NBA. Fans who hope to have their questions answered by one of the draft prospects can use #NBADraftCash.

As the NBA continues to extend their fan base worldwide, as shown by their Global Games programme which sees NBA teams play regular season games around the world as well as playing against local teams in each region, digital appears to be a vital component in their geographical expansion.

For UK fans, the chance of having a Hangout with your favourite new NBA players might be a little ambitious considering the time difference between Brooklyn and England, but can stay up to date with all things NBA and the Draft at @NBAUK and www.facebook.com/NBAUK.

 

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Interview: How Wimbledon has become one of the most digital events in sport


This week I was lucky enough to have the opportunity to speak with Alexandra Willis. She is the Content and Communications Manager at the All England Lawn Tennis Club (AELTC) who look after Wimbledon. Meaning she is one busy lady at the moment!

The 2 week event starts on Monday with reigning champion Andy Murray number 3 seed, though probably not one of the favourites on 2014 form. The event has also been in the news with new initiatives with IBM and #DSLondon sponsor Grabyo. So what can we expect to see this year to keep fans engaged both at the event and watching from their homes?

To start with I asked Alexandra about the new IBM Social Media Command Centre, a platform that has been developed as a behind-the-scenes tool rather than publicly available. There are two main areas in which it will benefit both parties..

“It’s a great tool for IBM to use to monitor social buzz, enabling them to be able to balance their hosting requirements. So they know when to ramp it up when there is a rush of traffic and also scale down when things are a little quieter.  For us it’s about being able to see what the main topics people are talking about are and adjusting editorially. A good example would be Eugenie Bouchard in Australia when she reached the semi-finals – we can react and then tailor the content accordingly, making sure people people receive what they’re interested in at that particular time.”

But it’s not only from an editorial perspective that the Command Centre is helpful. They will also be able to see where people are tweeting from, who the influencers are, what are the trending topics and how people are responding to their posts, either positively or negatively. They’ve also made sure that they are screen grab-able so that they can fed into broadcast if needed and also enable them to produce a daily digest looking at who the buzz has been about.

Social Command Centre

Another big new move this year is the recent deal with real-time video sharing platform Grabyo. It’s not a new concept as both the US Open and Australian Open have done similar with recent Twitter acquisition SnappyTV, but it’s a really interesting one that fans will love.

“We were impressed by the capability to share video content in real-time. We’ve decided not to commercialise it and instead are putting our focus into ensuring it is the best fit possible for our output. We want to encourage people to tune into broadcast and engage with matches. We’ll be showing moments such as walk-ons, crowd reactions and funny moments rather than match highlights. We’re not competing with the broadcasters but complementing what they do and encouraging people to tune in.”

Another IBM/Wimbledon initiative that has gained the attention of many in the industry, especially following a launch event at the Apple Store in Covent Garden with Tim Henman last week. In previous years the technology has concentrated on interacting with fans who are not at the tournament. Now they want to bring those visiting the famous venue more into the fold.

This ‘Hill Vs World‘ idea has been born out of wanting to interact with all fans no matter where they are. Using the IBM Social Media Command Centre to power it, they will be asking fans questions throughout the tournament. The difference here is that fans on Henman Hill will be asked a question and a hashtag to respond. The same question will be asked on other platforms and in broadcast with another hashtag. Then they’ll compare the answers, a bit like a Twitter battle, pitching both sets of fans against each other.

Hill Vs World

One issue that tennis has to face every two years is a clash with major football tournaments, such as the World Cup. So I asked Alexandra how they deal with this. Do they just ignore it and go on as usual or embrace it?

“We’re not going to ignore the fact the World Cup is taking place, in fact quite the opposite. On Google Plus we’re running a fun campaign where we’re asking fans to send in their photos of where they’re watching Wimbledon. It doesn’t matter if you’re in Brazil for the football or anywhere else in the world. If we tried to ignore it then it would be counterproductive. It’s also interesting to see what impact second screen viewing will have and see if the World Cup actually has less of an impact than usual.”

Google Plus has long been a platform that has split opinion within the industry, not just in sport but digital as a whole. But it’s one that Wimbledon has embraced and seen them grow to above the 1m fan mark. So how did they achieve this?

“In 2013 we ran a competition where we asked fans to send in photos of them in their Wimbledon whites or showing the grass they were playing on. People really like the creative engagement and getting involved. Our success has been in sharing pictures, both our own and fans, and the link with YouTube is also strong. Tailoring content for specific platforms is important and I think fans appreciate that.”

So what else can we expect across the Wimbledon social media platforms? On Twitter they will have a Twitter Mirror installed in the queue and they’ll be asking people to get involved with a daily selfie competition. On Instagram they will be installing an ‘InstaBooth’ in the player’s lounge where the players will be giving their thoughts on how the day has gone and other behind-the-scenes info.

The ‘Live at Wimbledon’ shows will be back on YouTube. Providing daily content from every day of the competition with their studio set up and commentators giving fans alternative insights into the game. There may be a Google Hangout or two but the issue of player access means that this is hard to plan for.

Another interesting area for events such as Wimbledon is, what do you do to engage with fans and carry on using social media platforms for the other 50 weeks of the year?  It turns out to be one that is very much down to the event owners themselves and there is no set rule.

“This is where social media has proved to be really strong for us. People appreciate updates from around the year, whether it be the courts covered in snow or players turning up for a hit. Some of it is planned and some is done on the fly. We don’t know when a player might turn up but we do know when certain events are happening so we are able to plan for them.”

At the end of the tournament, all these activations and ideas will be looked at both internally and externally and everyone will have a view on whether it was a success. But what does success look like for Alexandra?

“Numbers are not so important to us. It’s more about engaging with fans and ensuring anyone who wants to follow the event can do so. The perception of the brand and ensuring that all fans have a good experience across all platforms is really important to us. Last year we saw almost 20m users across all devices, with over 50% coming from mobile devices. Although we’re expecting a bit of a dip this year due to the World Cup.”

Thanks to Alexandra for taking time out to speak with me during what must be one of the most hectic weeks of her year. You can follow Alexandra on @Alex_Willis and make sure you catch the tournament which starts on Monday!

YouTube Preview Image

 

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The Premier League 2013/14 Facebook Recap [infographic]


Little has been spoken about the Premier League in recent weeks as the World Cup hits our screens tonight with the opening ceremony followed by Brazil’s opening game against Croatia.

But analytics company Locowise have perked our attention with the release of an interesting infographic that gives a thorough breakdown, and a number of interesting stats about how our teams have been performing on Facebook.

It looks past the obvious stats, such as Manchester United having the biggest Facebook page – which has just passed 50m fans, a good 20m more than nearest rival Chelsea.  For example, did you know that Hull’s page fan base grew by an impressive 787% during the season? Or that there were 34,159 total posts made by all the clubs?

Take a look below at this and many more interesting stats from the season just past. How did your team perform?

epl_infographic2

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Who’s Winning The #WorldCup Battle Of The Brands On Twitter? #stats


With only 2 days until the opening ceremony in Rio of the 2014 FIFA World Cup, we thought we’d take a look at who is being talked about on Twitter. This last month has seen all the main sponsors (and the traditional ambush brands) pushing their multi-million pound ad campaigns.

All those brands will be looking at how many times they’ve getting mentioned on Twitter – as well as a deep dive into who it is who is doing the talking (influencers), what they’re talking about (good or bad) and if it’s actually affected their bottom line.

There are some easy direct comparisons to make as there tends to be a big sponsor and then an equally large brand who are looking for a piece of the World Cup action. Below we’ve taken a look at adidas v Nike, Coca Cola v Pepsi and Hyundai v Vauxhall.

adidas v Nike

This is the one which has already filled out many column inches in both the trade press and traditional business ones too. The last World Cup was dominated by Nike with their “Write The Future” campaign headed by Cristiano Ronaldo. This time adidas haven’t been as complacent with a number of new digital initiatives, whilst Nike have once again gone for the BIG player dominated ad (and cartoon).

So lets take a look at the mentions of @adidasfootball v @nikefootball

Screen Shot 2014-06-10 at 11.19.40

It may come as a bit of a surprise to see that @adidasfootball has so far dominated the conversation over the last month. The main spike from @nikefootball coming in the last few days with the release of the final part of their film trilogy “The Last Game“. adidas saw their peak come with the launch of “The Dream” ad featuring their star man, Leo Messi.

What we are missing is the peaks in April when the big ads started to hit our screens. It’s going to be close this year for sure in the battle of the two dominant sports brands during the Finals itself. And then we’ll find out the financial results later on in the year when we hear who made their sales targets.

Coca Cola v Pepsi

This is as keenly fought as the battle of the sports brands. Coca Cola are a long-time supporter of FIFA and have recently renewed their sponsorship up until 2022. Pepsi have taken the Nike approach to major events and spent their money on marketing campaigns and players rather than event sponsorships.

This is more clear cut with Coca Cola enjoying much of the conversation. What it doesn’t show though is a break down of those mentions that include the World Cup or football. Some of the peaks are around non-sports events and gives an indication more of their overall performance as a brand.

Coca Cola v Pepsi

 

Hyundai v Vauxhall

This is a slightly left field one but worth looking at after the recent involvement of both brands at last month’s Digital Sport London event. Hyundai (in co-sponsorship with Kia) are a FIFA partner whilst Vauxhall are involved in the event through their sponsorship of the England team.

Hyundai have been running competitions to brand the team buses (which didn’t go entirely to plan) and in the UK have partnered with Copa90 to provide a different platform to talk about the event. Vauxhall meanwhile have loaded their campaign up front with Facebook Q&A’s and behind-the-scenes content from friendlies and training days as the players started to prepare for their trip to Brazil.

It’s clear though that Hyundai have a long way to when it comes to maximising their presence on social media for their football sponsorship. They have no dedicated football account, which they do on Facebook but has not been updated since Euro 2012. Vauxhall meanwhile have @vauxhallengland which has been highly active and looking to engage with football fans.

hyundai v vauxhall

 

The Outsider

One that people didn’t expect to come to the fore as it did was Beats By Dre. They launched their fantastic “Game Before The Game” video with Neymar, Fabregas, Sturridge and many more World Cup stars featuring in it. It certainly made an impact but has seen mentions taper off in recent days and the hashtag #GameBeforeTheGame has not really caught on with the public.

Beats By Dre

 

And Finally…

With the event almost upon us after month’s, if not years, of anticipation you can see that people are talking about it much more now that it is within site. Teams have finished their preparations, their have been the anticipated protests and upscaling of the articles about Qatar in 2022. This has all led to a significant increase in mentions of #WorldCup, #WorldCup2014 and #FIFA (far more mentions of FIFA by hashtag than account is maybe something they should look at).

FIFA World Cup twitter

 

Enjoy the World Cup everyone. We’ll be keeping an eye on Twitter (and other platforms) activity over the next month and report back all the interesting findings it throws up.

 

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adidas launch live World Cup YouTube show, ‘The Dugout’


The picture is becoming clearer from one of the biggest sponsors of FIFA, who recently extended their deal until 2030, after the release of their recent TV ad… and now news of a brand new YouTube series. It presents a major shift for the sports brand as they go directly after World Cup broadcasters, stating that “the traditional press conference is no more..”!

The global sports manufactorer is going to be broadcasting live from Rio a series of exclusive programmes on the platform starting from the first day of the World Cup, June 12th. It’s a very similar move to that of Hyundai UK who teamed up with YouTube backed football channel Copa90 earlier in the year, though with a different emphasis. adidas have got together with Kick TV, the US equivalents of Copa90, which is part of MLS Digital for this one.

It will be hosted by Jimmy Conrad, Layla Anne-Lee and Hugh Wizzy and give fans the opportunity to take part in a virtual press conference incorporating live interviews with the likes of Cafu, Kaka and Lucas Moura, adidas product reviews, behind-the-scenes action with adidas sponsored teams and chances to win prizes.

It’s another part of the adidas sponsorship plan that has been over 2 years in the making. London-based social media agency We Are Social will have been closely involved in the strategy and will I’m sure be on-site working long shifts to make this the best campaign ever.

Senior PR Manager (adidas Football), Rob Hughes, someone I knew well from my time at WAS (disclosure: I used to work on the adidas account at WAS), has said;

“The Dugout is a very exciting concept for Adidas, bringing together the best of Adidas talent with the reach of YouTube. The broadcasts will allow all football fans around the world to participate in the global conversation surrounding the Fifa World Cup. This youth-magazine-style football show will be fans’ inside view into the tournament, showcasing Brazil at its best with many famous faces and will be a must-watch throughout the competition,”

The first show is being aired at 2.00pm BST (10.00am BRT) and there will be 6 in total as part of the #AllInOrNothing campaign that has been intriguing commentators around the world since its launch. The final show will be on the eve of the World Cup Final. You’ll be able to watch it on the adidas Football YouTube page at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uuAPWG5e8lQ&feature=share

“The streaming of live adidas shows from Brazil is a unique brand proposition and a great example of a strategic partnership creating new, engaging and innovative content to a relevant audience. Our partnership with adidas has already seen us work together on many elements of their World Cup campaign, and these broadcasts will position adidas and YouTube at the heart of the conversation around this summer’s tournament. We are delighted that the World Cup’s number one partner, adidas, has chosen YouTube to play such a central role in their World Cup campaign.” - Lucas Watson, VP, Global Brand Solutions at YouTube.

It’s another different approach we’ve seen in recent weeks, but not so different from what Hyundai have put together. It is is though an example of a brand directly taking on traditional broadcasters as they make use of their access to players, coaches and other World Cup content. They’re also working with an already established YouTube channel in Kick TV and thus will be tapping into their audience. The start of a new trend?

Add to that the expected big spend using YouTube TrueView and they’re be looking to get the attention of every football fan out there. I also expect to see and really tight and well executed social media plan that will bring others into the conversation.

Will you be tuning in?

 

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FIFA Digital at the 2014 FIFA #WorldCup Brazil


It’s now less than a week until the 2014 World Cup starts in Brazil, as long as the stadiums are ready of course. The excitement you can feel has been building with the pre-WC friendly matches well underway and Panini stickers being swapped at a furious rate.

Last week I took a look at what a few of the brands had been doing in the build up to the world’s second biggest tournament (only the Olympics outdoes it in terms of audience). So this time I’m going to look at what FIFA itself has been doing when it comes to digital.

The primary destinations for fans will be FIFA.com, m.fifa.com (the newly revamped app which has encountered some issues), Facebook and Twitter. No big surprises with the social channels chosen, so no place for the likes of Google+, YouTube or WhatsApp at the moment – concentrating on doing a few well is always better than doing too much just for the sake of it.

The video content is being housed on FIFA.com as they look to keep their quality content on an area they have most control and also links to their sponsors and other digital platforms. This is also true with the Live Blog from Brazil, with a key element being the embedding of tweets and Facebook posts from fans, stakeholders, media and key influencers. Live blogging is something we’ve seen grow massively with the European Tour, Man City, Premier League and many others taking advantage of it.

The big new activation for FIFA is ‘Global Stadium’, a concept we covered here only a few days ago when it was launched.  Their aim is to unite fans from around the world and capture the excitement and spirit of the World Cup. Fans can #JoinIn and are able to;

  • Follow the match through the Live Blog and stats
  • See social posts from players, coaches and celebrities and interact with their own friend’s posts
  • Discuss the game as it happens with a worldwide audience
  • Get involved in a variety of exclusive activities such as winning the actual kick-off ball from that game and voting for their Man of the Match

On Facebook and Twitter they have stated that their core content aims fall under 5 sub-headings; Football, Fans, Facilitation, Fun and FIFA. In simple terms, covering everything on the pitch; engaging fans in fun, interactive contests and asking them to share THEIR content; showcasing some of FIFA’s core programmes and initiatives; and facilitating the journey of fans and media, by providing regular, up-to-date, relevant information.

Facebook

FIFA’s first Facebook page was launched in June 2013 to coincide with the FIFA Confederations Cup. Twelve pages are now live, with the FIFA World Cup page now having over 19 million fans worldwide. The content is image driven. Photos, videos, trivia questions, exclusive interviews, fan promotions in the FIFA online store, news on the launch of ticket sales phases, and the promotion of fun fan games, such as
the Online Panini album aim to provide a variety of content.

FIFA’s extensive archive also enables us to take a look back at the stars of the past. Working together with FIFA’s Partners, they are also able to tell the story of unique opportunities provided at every FIFA competition, for example, through the FIFA Youth Programme, for children to get a birds-eye view, by being a player escort or being part of the ball crew.

In April 2014, eight out of the ten fastest-growing sports pages on Facebook belonged to FIFA, and at the beginning of May 2014, FIFA merged its two World Cup Facebook pages – one historic; one focused on Brazil 2014, to create one central World Cup hub.

Twitter

FIFA’s presence on Twitter went live in mid-2010. There are accounts for FIFA (@fifacom) and @FIFAWorldCup in six languages, for the FIFA President and the FIFA Secretary General, as well as accounts for the FIFA Media Department (@FIFAMedia) and women’s football (@FIFAWWC).

The platform provides a personal and direct communication channel with fans, media, stakeholders and key influencers. Hashtags are used for FIFA’s tournaments to create discussion topics, regular interactive daily polls/Q&As are posted
to ask fans for their views on the ‘key topics of the day’ and wherever possible, breaking news is posted to ensure FIFA’s authentic message is relayed in real-time.

Overall, there are more than seven million followers across FIFA’s accounts. The platform was used for the official man of the match vote during FIFA Confederations Cup 2013 and will once again be utilised for the 2014 FIFA World Cup Brazil™, in an innovative activation together with Anheuser-Busch & Twitter. Fans will also be able to cast their Man of the Match vote on Twitter, across FIFA’s six @fifacom and six
@fifaworldcup language accounts, while votes will also be counted from FIFA.com too.

Hashtags

FIFA Digital will be using the following hashtags in six languages: #WorldCup, #Joinin, #GlobalStadium while each match will have its own hashtag too.

Monitoring

In order to measure effectiveness and better tailor content to our fans, FIFA utilises a variety of reporting/monitoring tools for real-time analytics. We will also be working together with social media platforms to provide key data, both as part of our daily content, but also to Media through the daily news briefings at the 2014 FIFA World Cup. FIFA Digital will also produce a series of Infographics at key stages of the competition, to provide key digital highlights.

 

 

 

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