Tag Archives: social media

10 simple ways to delight your fans

Ash Read is the founder of Nudge, a tool that helps you keep their customers happy with timely and meaningful replies on Twitter.

During the opening weekend of the Cricket World Cup I noticed a few tweets about @MCG Twitter account and their responsiveness to fans during the game between England and Australia.

Off the back of @MCG’s masterclass in Twitter customer service, Shane Harmon has already written a wonderful piece about Twitter Tips for Sports Stadiums, and today I want to focus more on some simple ways sporting organisations can delight fans and keep them coming back through the gates.

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Football League teams up with Twitter to give fans the chance to “Own The Arch”

The Football League is giving fans on Twitter around the world the chance to decide the colour of the Wembley arch as part of a unique first in the build up to Sunday’s Capital One Cup Final between Chelsea and Tottenham Hotspur.

The innovative social media vote is the first time the iconic arch has been utilised in this way to let fans decide how the national stadium looks ahead of a major Cup Final.  It will also be the first time it has ever been lit up in a football club’s colours.

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Kick It Out: How charities can make an impact on Social Media

Guest Post: Hash Piperdy joined Kick It Out in May 2014 and assists with the organisation’s website and social media output. Kick It Out can be reached @KickItOut, while Hash tweets from @Codenamehash.

If you follow football, you’ve probably heard of Kick It Out, or I suppose our previous name, the organisation formerly known as Let’s Kick Racism Out of Football. I joined the charity in May, after deciding I wanted to work in football, I wanted to move to London, and I wanted to do some good. Kick It Out ticked all the boxes.

I was shocked when I got here. Without looking on our WordPress-built site, how many people do you think work at a national charity that works within football? As a clue, most people who phone us trying to sell us something make the same mistake…

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Interview with Digital Manager of the NFL’s Green Bay Packers

Despite narrowly missing out on Super Bowl XLIX, Green Bay Packers are one of the clubs leading the way when it comes to digital fan engagement – and as the only fan-owned NFL franchise, they’re in the perfect position to own the space.

I got the chance to share a beer with Garrison Cummings, Digital Manager for the Green Bay Packers, and talk about the Packers approach to digital content, and how it compares with the likes of Premier League football clubs.

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5 Years of Digital Sport: Mark Segal on social media engagement and niche networks

To help us celebrate 5 years… yes 5 years… to the day of Digital Sport (and its previous iteration, UK Sports Network) I’ve asked some of our original contributors back to give some of their thoughts on the changes they have seen in that time. First up is Mark Segal who had the ‘honour’ of being the site’s first ever author on 22nd January 2010!

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Leicester City Top Social Media League Table of British Sports Teams

Last year we covered the first Sport Social Media Index, compiled by the guys at Umpf in Leeds and ranked by a panel of four judges. The list covers 148 professional football, rugby and cricket teams in the UK and is the most comprehensive of its kind.

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Inter Milan & Aston Villa lead way in China outside of Top 15 clubs in digital survey

Red Card 2015 is a preview to the annual Mailman ‘China Digital Champions League’ report that looks at the performance of Europe’s top clubs within the country. The agency has taken a look at the clubs outside of the top 15, almost the Europa League of digital performance.

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How technology has changed on the UK sports media industry forever

Recently I was invited to write an article on the Vodafone small business blog “Your Better Business”, which I was delighted to accept. The objective of the article was to give an overview of how the sports media industry has been transformed by changes in technology and what the future holds for the industry. Below is my summary and you can see the original here, love to hear if you agree…

Widely available internet access has enabled anyone’s voice to be heard, and on a scale never imaginable of before. I’ve been blogging on sport and the impact of digital media on it for the last five years and it’s only the ready availability of free websites like WordPress, cheap hosting and social media to promote articles and research new ones that has really made it possible.

The impact that technology has had on sport and how it is reported, whether it’s on certain niches such as digital and sport or more general discussions around teams and leagues around the world, has been huge. Previously you could say that sport needed the media, almost on an unconditional basis. But the boot is now firmly on the other foot so to speak.

Marc Cooper, until recently the Head of Audience and Content at The Football League, gave some insight into how the relationship between fans, the media and football teams has changed;

“Football clubs have always been able to give fans certain things that other media can’t, which is information and confirmation. Fans may have read about their team being linked with certain players, and they’ll look to their club website to confirm it. But fans want more than that. They want to be entertained too, and they want to know more about the players at their club. That’s another area that clubs can serve the fans well.”

It’s not only the major sports that have reaped the benefits of being in a more connected world. The so-­‐called ‘lesser known sports’ can now act as their own media company, not having to rely on the scraps available within mainstream publications. This really is a game changer for them and will help raise awareness for their sport and get people interested in playing and/or watching it.

So where does that leave the journalist? The truth is that this has been the most radical shift in the media business in generations. And as with all periods of change there will be a time of adjustment as the old slowly learns how to work with and make use of the new.

The journalist is now the independent trusted resource, the one who has used his/her contacts and found out what is actually happening, not just the rumours (most of the time). They can spend time putting together great analysis and speak directly to the players involved. They are now the authentication, the experts we turn to when in doubt.

The relationship between fans and the media will continue to evolve as technology provides even greater access and insight. Fans will undoubtedly be the winners as the media they consume revolves more around when and where they want to do so.

Geo targeting of information is becoming more refined, helping to merge the online and offline worlds. We will see teams and leagues take back more control of their media, relying less on media rights as they produce their own income from subscriptions, sponsorship and advertising. Until those rights packages that are sold now become unsustainable, or Apple or Google bid for them, then this will take more time to see any radical shifts in live sports especially.

We are still in the early days of this explosion in media and technology, the tip of the iceberg in fact. But what it safe to say is that for media companies to stay relevant there needs to be a change in the mind sets of those involved. To become more fan-centric and deliver the types of content when they want it and how they want it.

The speed of change we are seeing now is frightening at times but this also means that new opportunities are opening up everyday. These gaps in the market are there to be seized upon by whoever is brave and forward thinking enough to spot them. There’s never been a more exciting time to be working in this industry than now!

– See more at: http://yourbetterbusiness.co.uk/the-symbiosis-of-media-and-sport/#sthash.VpXEOHMg.dpuf