Tag Archives: social media

Europe retain the Ryder Cup – How it played out on social media

Yesterday saw the by then expected win for Team Europe as they took their 10-6 overnight lead from Saturday and turned it into a 16 1/2 – 11 1/2 win.

Over the course of the week, the buzz was building for the Gleneagles based tournament as the best players from the US and Europe went head-to-head.

But there were also big things happening away from the main play, as organisers looked to make it the most digital golf event ever.  With 3 main Twitter accounts being the ones to follow, with @rydercup, @rydercupEUROPE and @rydercupUSA. The event is also great in the fact that so many of players are very active on social media, especially Twitter. Giving fans great insights into what goes on behind the scenes.

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Wearables

How will wearable technology impact social marketing for sports brands?

Saf Hossain is a Social Media Manager at We Play. We Play is a London-based sports social media agency helping brands commercialise their relationship with fans.

In an announcement that surprised very few people last week, Cupertino’s finest revealed the first ever Apple Watch. Many commentators are predicting that, like mp3 players, smartphones and tablets, Apple’s arrival into the smartwatch market provides wearable technology with mainstream appeal and long-term staying power.

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Celebrity Social – How Can Brands Leverage a Celebrity’s Social Media Following?

Guest post: Richard Williams is a digital strategist at digital web agency, Rawnet. Rawnet are also a supporter of the Digital Sport London event series.

Earlier this week, I found myself sitting on the toilet (Yes! – I have gone there in the opening sentence), eagerly opening new browsers on my phone, searching for the pair of trainers I had just seen on a football player’s Instagram page. You see, I’m a toilet browser. And like 75% of the male population, whether they admit it or not, I bring my iPhone to the toilet with me to pass the time.

Luckily for you, my toilet habits have nothing to do with this blog.

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wimbledon 2

Wimbledon generated 3.5m short clip video views across Facebook and Twitter

The AELTC has announced that they shared more than 300 short clips across Facebook and Twitter during the tournament, generating over 3.5m clip plays using Grabyo’s video platform.

Facebook saw the largest number of Wimbledon clip plays with over 1.5m views (42.9%), while 1.4m (40.6%) were on Twitter and nearly 600k (16.4%) were viewed within the Wimbledon.com based video gallery powered by Grabyo.

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Ryder Cup update: fans encouraged to use social media.. in most places

Following recent articles, including by yours truly, about the Ryder Cup not allowed ticket holders to upload images or video to social media during the tournament, the Ryder Cup team have come out with an announcement to clear things up.

Social media interaction, photography and the sharing of content are all going to be encouraged at The 2014 Ryder Cup, according to the organisers. Though not everywhere on the course.

Ryder Cup Europe has moved to reassure spectators that they will be allowed to take photos and video on their mobile phones during the event, and will be encouraged to share their experiences on social networks.

A range of initiatives are already in place for visitors to engage with when they arrive at the event. This includes the use of Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) technology, which will allow spectators to take part in fun activities around the course and share their experiences instantly on social media using a special wristband.

Ryder Cup Europe has also been working with the Scottish Government and mobile phone providers to provide ultrafast 4G wireless connections across the venue.

But organisers have rules in place for spectators on the course at Gleneagles in order to avoid disrupting players and the experience of other spectators. This is where it will still be hard for officials to police…

The use of cameras (and phones?) will be prohibited at each hole during play in order to avoid disrupting players and to enable a clear line of sight for all spectators, many of whom will be standing or sitting around the course rather than in a raised position in a grandstand.

Edward Kitson, Match Director of The 2014 Ryder Cup, said:

“We want people to share their stories online and feel part of The Ryder Cup. We have put in place a range of fantastic activities in the tented village and around the course that use technology to improve the visitor experience, and these are integrated with social networks. Selfies are positively encouraged and I expect to see plenty of them during the event.

 “However, I’m sure everyone will understand that we have to draw a line in the interests of fair play and respect for the players and fellow spectators. Therefore no photography or video will be allowed during play at any hole. This is something we fully expect everyone to support given that The Ryder Cup is won and lost on very fine margins: we want to give the teams every chance of a level playing field and ensure everyone can see the action.”

 Hopefully it will go smoothly but I imagine stopped people taking pictures of the final moments of the tournament will be exceptionally tough. It’s understandable that people trying to get a shot of their favourite player can be enormously off putting to said player, indeed there have been arguments between players and photographers/spectators about this for many years. It’s not just come about through the widespread use of social media.

Hopefully everything will go smoothly on the day, and fingers crossed for another victory for Europe!

Juventus Asian / Pacific Tour , Backstage video Andrea Pirlo is not impressed

Juventus nail it with #PirloIsNotImpressed

Juventus have been making great strides and been amongst the pioneers in digital amongst Serie A teams. And it’s latest idea, #PirloIsNotImpressed, has seen great global success since its launch on 22 August.

Shot during our recent summer tour in Sydney, the entertaining skit features Juventus and Italy star Andrea Pirlo judging four acts who seek to impress him with their respective performances.

Famed for his dead-pan expression, Pirlo is unmoved by what he sees before the challenge is then passed over to the online community, who are encouraged to try and win him over by sending in their own attempts.

In less than 10 days, the video has registered over 1.5 million views, 850k on YouTube and 700k on Facebook, and the hashtag has commanded a reach of over 20 million (figures provided by Juventus FC). At its peak, the #PirloIsNotImpressed hashtag was used almost 3,000 times in one day.

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In addition, #PirloIsNotImpressed has also been adopted by thousands of users in discussions unrelated to the world of football.

This engaging initiative continues to proceed and, after several Twitter replies along the lines of “nice try but better luck next time”, users remain eager to see if  anything is capable of winning Pirlo’s approval.

We wait to see how the club choose to extend the campaign but it’s one that shows the success in testing an idea and letting it grow organically. It is now something that could go on for a long time with its own cult following.

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ryder cup

Ryder Cup organisers ban photo/video uploads to social media by fans

This week it has been reported that guidelines have been issued to ticket holders warning them against posting images and video on social media for the duration of the tournament.

In a time when other sporting events are looking to capitalise on the proliferation of mobile phones, and second screen devices generally, it’s an interesting move that will prove hard to police. Imagine the winning putt or celebrations of the win not being posted to friends on Facebook as soon as it happens?

This doesn’t affect the millions who will be tuning in to watch Europe’s finest battle the US team. There will be a multitude of ways in which fans will be able to get their fix via digital but seeing the experiences of those on ground through their pictures won’t be one of them (more on that in another article soon).

With 250,000 people expected over the 6 days allowed to bring mobile phones onto the course (on silent) it’s going to be interesting to see how much officials enforce the rules which state;

“Images taken with a camera, mobile phone or other electronic device cannot be used for any purpose other than for private and domestic purposes. You must not sell, license, publish (including, without limitation, via Twitter or Facebook or any other social media site) or otherwise commercially exploit photographs.”

While texting is allowed, and calls in designated areas, mobile phones must be in silent mode at all times. Other prohibitions include a ban on autographs, running, personal mobility scooters and children under five.

A spokesman for Ryder Cup Europe told The Telegraph:

“The Ryder Cup is one of the world’s most recognised sporting events and as such we need to ensure that the brand, encompassing fair play, teamwork and camaraderie is protected at all times which means ensuring that images of the event are not used for monetary gain in a manner which may go against those principles.

“The taking of pictures during high pressure sporting events has also been shown to have an adverse effect on players, with shutter sounds and bright flashes proving to be a distraction at critical moments. It is not fair to compromise the sporting occasion for either the players or those spectating.”

One thing that may work in the organisers favour is the general lack of internet access at golf events. If they don’t add wifi stations around the course, as they did at the British Open this year, then the chance of 3G working with so many people around is going to be remote. Thus people will lose the moment and they wont be uploaded until they get home or to their hotel.

It’s not only the spectators who could be affected by this. The golfers involved are some of the heaviest users of social media, especially Twitter, in the sports world. The likes of Ian Poulter (1.7m fans), Justin Rose (363k), Rory McIlroy (2m), Bubba Watson (1.2m), Rickie Fowler (789k) and many of both teams have large followings to keep up to state – as well as appease sponsors.

Generally they are allowed to post pictures on practice days from on the course but not during playing days. Although The Telegraph talks about players not being able to use social media, the final decision on players using social media actually lies with the captain, in this case Paul McGinley, who isn’t active on social himself.

Back in 2010, when it was last held in Europe, one of the most entertaining aspects was following the players updates throughout the event as Europe went on to an exciting win. It was the first time social media was able to give us insights into golf’s greatest event and has remained popular with the games players and fans since.

Fingers crossed McGinley allows his players to remain active away from the course and we get to see McIlroy and his teammates celebrating with a selfie!

 

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#CoolJob: Social Media Manager at 1966 Group

1966 was founded in 2006 by Terry Byrne and specialises in maximising intellectual property rights, global licensing, branding, endorsements and appearances globally within the football industry.

The team consists of coaches, ex players, managers and global brand and events experts with world-class expertise within the sports industry.

1966 exclusively manages the commercial interests of the England football team including full representation and management of the players commercial programme and relationship with the FA and its partners

 

Role: Social Media Manager

Salary: £25k-£30k pa

Job Function:

Reporting directly to the Head of Communications, the Social Media Manager will be responsible for creating and implementing the social media strategy for all companies within the 1966 group and specific individuals  within the footballing industry.

 

1966/United Marketing

  • Create social media channels and populate
  • Grow followers b2b for SEO
  • Give individual advice to high profile sporting personal on content strategy for their own social media channels

England Footballers Foundation

  • Social media content strategy and calendar to grow followers and engagement
  • Work with the players themselves to create content, tweets etc

Core Responsibilities:

  • Hands on approach to create, implement and populate the strategy for the 1966 groups social media presence across existing platforms on a day-to-day basis.
  • Daily moderation, content updates, monitoring and community management of social platforms
  • Provide your own creative flair and social media expertise
  • Reporting to key internal stakeholders on new and emerging social media platforms and wider market trends.

Desired Skills and Experience

  • A minimum two years relevant digital/social media experience.
  • Displays in-depth knowledge and understanding of Social Media platforms and their respective participants (Facebook, Twitter, Yelp, Google+Local, YouTube, Instagram, Pinterest etc) and how each platform can be utilised in different scenarios
  • Some background knowledge of Public Relations would be useful
  • Possesses ability to identify potential negative or crisis situations and apply conflict resolution principles to mitigate issues
  • Strong project management or organisational skills
  • Excellent written and verbal communication skills.
  • Must be comfortable with out-of-hours work and working reactively to tight deadlines.
  • Knowledge of and interest in football and its unique position within social media.
  • Track record of increasing reach and engagement through own ideas and individual management of social accounts.
  • Demonstrates creativity and documented immersion in social media, and can provide examples.
  • Familiarity with social monitoring tools.
  • A team player with confidence to take the lead and guide other employees where necessary.
  • Familiarity of working with high-profile figures.

 

Applications should be sent into enquiries@1966.com

 

 

1966