Tag Archives: Marketing

#WeAreChosen – An Interview with Everton’s Director of Media & Comms

Towards the end of each season is when the different departments within a football club have to start thinking about the following season, and asking fans to renew their season tickets.

For many it will be the usual methods of email (and snail mail) marketing, activity on social media and posters up at the ground. But few act in a creative way and even fewer make it into something a bit special.

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Interview with Digital Manager of the NFL’s Green Bay Packers

Despite narrowly missing out on Super Bowl XLIX, Green Bay Packers are one of the clubs leading the way when it comes to digital fan engagement – and as the only fan-owned NFL franchise, they’re in the perfect position to own the space.

I got the chance to share a beer with Garrison Cummings, Digital Manager for the Green Bay Packers, and talk about the Packers approach to digital content, and how it compares with the likes of Premier League football clubs.

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Inter Milan & Aston Villa lead way in China outside of Top 15 clubs in digital survey

Red Card 2015 is a preview to the annual Mailman ‘China Digital Champions League’ report that looks at the performance of Europe’s top clubs within the country. The agency has taken a look at the clubs outside of the top 15, almost the Europa League of digital performance.

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Connecting Your Audience to the Sport

Guest Post: David Johnson is Commercial Director at Skylab. David has vast experience as a digital video content strategist, and as a broadcast manager for the 2004 Olympic Games, two FIFA World Cups, two UEFA Euros, and a UEFA Champions League Final. He is also an award-winning creative director/producer.

How many people walk through the doors to a sports venue each time there’s a major event, is it hundreds? Thousands? Tens of thousands, perhaps? The possibility of connecting with each  and every of them and deliver tailor made content directly to them has never been more real thanks to the continually and rapidly developing digital landscape.

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Man City expand its digital portfolio with specially redesigned app for iPad users

Barclays Premier League Champions, Manchester City today announced the launch of their new official iPad App.

Designed for City fans, the City App iPad Edition is the latest addition to the Club’s ever expanding digital portfolio.

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Wimbledon generated 3.5m short clip video views across Facebook and Twitter

The AELTC has announced that they shared more than 300 short clips across Facebook and Twitter during the tournament, generating over 3.5m clip plays using Grabyo’s video platform.

Facebook saw the largest number of Wimbledon clip plays with over 1.5m views (42.9%), while 1.4m (40.6%) were on Twitter and nearly 600k (16.4%) were viewed within the Wimbledon.com based video gallery powered by Grabyo.

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The Hidden Value Of Vine

Guest Post: Tom Kelk is a tech/sport blogger and Senior Social Exec at communications agency, Pitch. You can find him on Twitter (@TomKelk), LinkedIn and his blog

Was I the only one who looked through the Loops of my own account to be pleasantly surprised by the number of Loops I’d received on my personal channel? I’ve only put out 15 Vines, but these have been watched over 230,000 times.

This intrigued me on two counts, if I’ve amassed over 230,000 Loops, what have brands generated? And secondly, what do these Loops show? Is Vine actually providing more value to brands than we’ve thought?

First off, Vine is part of the digital strategy of many brands, but it’s not central to it. It’s a subsidiary. That’s not going to change, but looking at how brands are racking up thousands of Loops within a short space of time, Vine might just be a more central aspect of brand strategies. The numbers are particularly impressive.

Brands like Ford EU and Charmin have racked up over 20m Loops between them. Both of their YouTube channels combined total 34m views. So the results on Vine are not too shabby given the dramatic disparity between the cost of generating YouTube video compared to six seconds of Vine! If we break this down, Charmin attracted 8m Loops from 67 Vines, an average of 119,000 per Vine.

On YouTube, they’ve seen 159,000 views per video. It’s not far off. It’s even more apparent with Ford EU, who generated 12m views of 47 videos, averaging 255,000 Loops per Vine. Compare this to YouTube, where Ford EU has managed 29,673 views per video. Consider this greater deal of production cost, you’d have to argue that Vine is providing quite the value for Ford EU.

Then there are those putting more effort into Vine, including post-production uploading, like Nike Football. They’ve amassed over 19m Loops on their own through 14 Vines – that’s an average of over 1.35m Loops per Vine! Let’s say, for argument sake, that an individual watches a Vine three times (probably closer to two but go with it), that means around 5.5m people have potentially viewed Nike’s content on Vine.

With Nike so reliant on time with their ambassadors for content, the opportunity to create a series of Vines in their time with an asset, as opposed to one or two glossy YouTube edits, is an attractive option. Worth the investment? I think so.

Following on from these total numbers, there’s the added bonus of the watching of a Vine several times repeated. It begs the question, when watched three times, is the penetration of simple, condensed messaging, greater than a three-minute long YouTube video?

There are obviously pieces of content that need to be hosted on either channel through necessity, and it’s clearly not as black and white as the numbers suggest, but it could be worth a study, right?

Please excuse the crude analytics, but they simply illustrate the potential in Vine if executed correctly. Many brands will have Vine as a part of their digital strategy, but perhaps it’s time for a little bit more of that YouTube budget to be reallocated into creating Vines.

Back in April last year, I wrote about how brands should be taking Vine more seriously, and whilst it is evolving, it’s been painfully slow with brands. Maybe, with quantifiable metrics, we might just see that investment.

 

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