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Interview: How the Open Championship is utilising iBeacons, Wi-Fi and storytelling


Tomorrow sees this year’s Open Golf Championship take place at Royal Liverpool. Starting on Thursday it sees the world’s top golfers, including Tiger Woods after a lengthly absence through injury, come to our shores for one of the most testing events on the golfing calendar.

Golf has been a sport that has embraced digital advances over the past few years, at the top end at least. You can find most players on Twitter (more so than Facebook) and each major event looks to engage with the thousands of fans who come through the gates, as well as the millions who tune in on TV.

Kevin Bain is the R&A’s Digital Manager who is based most of the time in the beautiful town of St. Andrews (the home my family originates from). Last week I was delighted that Kevin could take some time out of his hectic diary to speak to me about what their plans are for this years event.

Wi-Fi

One of the biggest investments that was trialled last year and is now being expanded upon is the installation of wifi points around the course. 350 access points have now been installed giving Wi-Fi coverage on every grandstand.

The test took place at Muirfield where the whole course had fibre optic cable installed with 200 access points. It was promoted in venue and allowed for video streaming as well as scoring and other information. It was 30k people use the facility with a peak of 3.5k concurrent users.

One of the most interesting findings was around usage – they expected video streaming to be the key driver but it turned out that GPS tracking of players on the course was the most used feature, showing who was teeing off from where and what their current score was.

iBeacons are another development which has been trialled in a small way before and are now being tested on a larger scale. In the US they are being utilised around many sports stadiums and they are proving to be a useful way in which to communicate with people around the course.

There will be a welcome message at the pay gate at the course and one of the incentives is being entered into a prize draw for tickets for next years Open. Certainly one that many keen golf fans attending will be open to. Also, at the 3rd hole there will trial messaging informing fans about which players are coming through. Something useful that will help them decide at which point they want to be to see they’re favourite players.

Social Media

#OpenMoments was launched one week out from the tournament. They started asking fans about what their favourite Open moments are and they will then use they’re archive of images and video’s to show fans those that have been most mentioned. More than 100 videos were ready to go when they launched.

They’re also been helping to promote the #OpenCountdown from the host course, Royal Liverpool, with both campaigns aimed at boosting awareness of the event and excitement amongst golf fans.

open moments

They are also working with a company I know well, Storystream. This new social wall will allow fans to see all the conversations in one place from players, fans and official accounts from the organisers. They’re are already some great images and videos available on there. So make sure you check out social.theopen.com 

If you’ve been in the Liverpool are you may well have seen a bus going around with advertising on it for the tournament. To win tickets to go to the golf all fans had to do if they spotted it was to tweet in a picture of it and use the hashtag #OpenBus to win.

There are also the more usual digital features for fans to use such as the Open app to get scores, radio commentary, video stream, etc. Plus you can find out everything you need to know across Facebook and Twitter. This year has seen another Twitter first for the event as they have launched a Japanese language feed. This helps them tap into the 3rd largest golf market in the world, behind the US and UK.

Thanks to Kevin for taking the time out to let us know about their plans. I’m lucky enough to be going this week to find out more about how it looks from behind-the-scenes. Look out for the tweets from @danielmclaren.

2013 open

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Some memorable moments from the most social World Cup ever!


It’s all over. The most connected World Cup. The most digital World Cup. The most social World Cup…ever.

New sporting records were set for tweets sent, Facebook interactions and inappropriate photos involving Mario Balotelli and the Queen.

But with everyone from sponsors to sports stars, brands to broadcasters clambering over themselves to tap into the Brazilian buzz, what made you smile or share?

Andy McKenzie of digital sports content specialists LiveWire Sport picked out some memorable moments from the last month.

Pre-tournament

The weeks and months leading up to major events are always hugely important for brands to maximise their time with big names before disappearing behind FIFA’s commercial curtain.

Digital campaigns leading up to the World Cup Finals generally centred around gaining maximum exposure for high-end advertising campaigns featuring star players.

Adidas and Beats by Dre caught the eye, but Nike stole the pre-tournament show.

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Nice storytelling, a hint of humour and Rooney’s dodgy Scouse accent helped earn their 64m YouTube views for The Last Game, without any of their stars presumably even having to appear in front of a green screen or step into a recording booth.

Good job they got in early as the only player in the campaign that made it as far as the semi-finals was David Luiz, who perhaps took Nike’s ‘Risk Everything’ message too seriously.

Hats off to the Daily Telegraph’s Project Babb for a brilliantly stitched together Roy Hodgson rap. Altogether now – “You’ve got to hold and give…”

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And both the BBC and Guardian built some nice interactive tools for picking your best-ever World Cup side.

 

Kick-off

Time to unveil the shiny new technological toys.

The official FIFA.com site had a new live centre and a social hub that was packed full of detail and data, with sponsors like McDonald’s, Hyundai, Castrol and Budweiser handed some prime real estate, while Sony had a destination of their own at One Stadium Live.

Facebook created a World Cup hub to access content, while Twitter rolled out a number of innovations including hashflags, man-of-the-match voting (sponsored by Budweiser), score updates and dedicated match pages for each game.

ITV used Grabyo and partnered with Paddy Power and Twitter Amplify to maximise their live rights, while everyone enjoyed some friendly fun at the expense of Robbie Savage

Every detail of the tournament was analysed – even down to who won the World Cup of arm-folding (some welcome news for Tottenham fans).

 

Big moments

The rapid rise of real-time content continues.

Who can react quickest to those huge talking points, with brands all trying to create that ‘Oreo moment’.

Adidas set up a newsroom in Rio to react to events by creating content and it seems the #allin motto applies to the resources they put behind it.

There was the odd marketing own goal – like Delta’s giraffe gaffe and KLM’s Mexican mischief  – and a few weird ones – like Listerine’s #PowerToYourMouth.

Brazil’s monumental fall from grace was perfect Paddy Power territory

while PornHub gained an unexpected uplift in extra followers on the back of their tweet.

Brilliant Ads shared a quite brilliant take on the 2014 logo that got nearly 13k retweets

while @brazuca was silenced for one night.

The USA finally fell in love with soccer. Obama watched on Air Force One, Hulk Hogan and Will Ferrell pledged their allegiance to the beautiful game and then there was Tim Howard and THOSE saves.

Hats off to the Scottish FA for reacting to Germany’s crushing of Brazil with a timely and humorous post about their upcoming Euro 2016 qualifier (v Germany).

Scottish FA

The Final

Things turned out nice in the end for adidas in their battle with Nike as Messi and Muller, Argentina and Germany all manufactured their way to the final, seeing off the Nike-sponsored pair of Brazil and the Netherlands in the semi-finals.

Adidas had David Beckham on their YouTube show The Dugout, the official ball, the winners of the Golden Glove, the Golden Ball and the Golden Boot.

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Nike still had the match-winning Mario Gotze

but maybe nobody reacted better than Lufthansa to Germany’s win.

As another major sporting event passes through our timelines, what has stood out for you? Did we miss any outstanding World Cup content? Is anyone out there really interested in animals predicting scores?

 

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Is Sponsorship being devalued by Social Media?


Guest Post: Tom Kelk is a tech/sport blogger and Senior Social Exec at communications agency, Pitch. You can find him on Twitter (@TomKelk)

This is the first World Cup where brands have heavily activated around the tournament through digital channels – when they have no sponsored right to do so. Since South Africa 2010, Facebook has more than doubled its monthly active users, Twitter users now send more than 10x as many tweets per day and now Instagram exists!

The social media landscape has been transformed in four years, and gives an indication to why brands are putting the effort into activating around Brazil 2014. Surely all this chatter around an event is a dream come true for the official sponsors? It’s not quite that simple.

In a recent study by Unruly Media, only four of the top 11 most viewed brand ads about the World Cup were from sponsors. Less than half. Continental Tyres – one of the leading official sponsors, didn’t feature at all. Sony – an official partner, are nowhere to be seen.

Unruly Media Braziliant Brand Tracker

Unsurprisingly, Nike use their assets and force the relation in the minds of consumers. All the Nike-sponsored teams and players were involved in their heavy-cost ad that implies they are official sponsors – but they’re not.  If you did a poll, how many would say Nike were a main World Cup sponsor?

Beats have come out trumps from this World Cup through an impressive ad utilising their playing assets. Again, no ‘right’ to have a World Cup conversation but used World Cup players to enable the link with the consumer.

Obviously the study isn’t flawless, but it does continue to highlight an interesting question. In the digital age, is there still the same value in being an official sponsor?

To answer the question, it’s worth dissecting a sponsorship package to understand where the value still lies, and where better to look, than FIFA.

FIFA state that a sponsor benefits from: “Wide product category exclusivity which is afforded to all Commercial Affiliates, allowing each brand to distinguish themselves from competing brands in their product category.” Now, whilst this has been aggressively reinforced in and around the stadiums, this is far from true in a digital space. To start with, look at the table above. Nike above adidas, Samsung above Sony and Nissan above Hyundai. Not looking that distinguished from competitors there… What about beer brands? Budweiser, official sponsor, have activated heavily around the World Cup:

But has that stopped Newcastle Brown Ale benefitting from the platform? Not one bit.

Another key benefit outlined by FIFA, is “offering a unique platform vis-à-vis their competitors.” This point is the crux of the debate. I would argue that this platform has disintegrated in recent years. Social media has enabled brands without the official connection to ambush these ‘unique platforms’.You only have to consider the Suarez incident.

There was a clamour for attention from brands off the back of the biting incident, but how many were official? The only one that springs to mind, was the Uruguayan Mcdonald’s Twitter account, which was more than likely not signed off in the higher echelons of Mcdonald’s as FIFA would absolutely frown upon sponsors discussing the incident!

Aside from the conversation, what else do FIFA sponsors have the ‘right’ to use? They can use official tournament title and logos – but is it beneficial, or is that in fact a hindrance? When using social media, audiences have developed an eye for official titling, and have almost developed an instinctive filter to those posts. Besides, as seen with the Snickers tweet above, who needs to reference the World Cup when over 5,000 tweets per second are being sent? Everyone knows what you’re talking about. In fact, could we go further and ask whether it could be better to work unofficially?

So, taking all this into account, does the traditional sponsorship model need altering to include further digital rights and should sponsors be negotiating harder to get this cover? Surely when their competitors begin to be more prominent in discussions over the World Cup, for example, surely they have a right to question costs?

Perhaps the new ideal ‘bigger brand’ model will follow the likes of Nike and Beats who find themselves less restricted by buying direct player assets and activate on an unofficial basis.Bigger brands will increasingly explore these opportunities in a creative capacity to give them the right to participate more heavily in these conversations. As for the smaller brands, they’ll continue to jump in and out when there’s a product link, and get small wins when they can.

There’s obviously still value in sponsorship. Access to assets like players and visible advertising rights are ultimately beneficial. However, social media allows a conversation to be had by brands when they couldn’t do so before without treading on toes and this is where sponsors need to be tougher on their sponsorships to maximise the value they receive on a digital platform, as well as a physical.

This is a topic that a dissertation could focus upon, and I’ve just brushed the surface here, but what do you think? Is the value of a sponsorship still the same and how has it been affected by the rise of social media? What should brands do to fight competitors on both platforms?

 

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Team GB launch interactive Pinterest Map showing history at the Olympic Games


Today, Team GB have launched an interactive Pinterest Map which looks at its entire history at the Olympic Games. In a really attractive looking activation they have come up with something that will fascinate fans in a really interactive way.

From Launceston Elliot in Athens 1896 to the men’s curling Silver at Sochi 2014 and all the medals won in-between, you can take a trip around the world and relive Team GB’s Olympic History: http://www.pinterest.com/teamgb/team-gbs-olympic-history/

The interactive map also features medal successes, Olympic Games logos and other top Team GB moments covering every Olympic Games from 1896 to 2014.  Pinterest forms part of Team GB’s social media strategy on the road to Rio 2016 as Team GB aim to engage with new audiences and fans.

Over the coming weeks Team GB will also roll out the historical timeline on its Facebook page, with one winter and summer Olympic Game being released each day. The timeline will feature as Facebook milestones and a photo album full of Team GB moments, stadium pictures and medal tallies.

When I recently ran a recent event looking at the World Cup in London, I asked Alex at FIFA if he had a question for the panel over Twitter. He asked what they thought FIFA could do better and more of, and the response was to utilise their massive World Cup archive.

That is just what Team GB are doing here and are using both Pinterest and Facebook to do this. Two of the most visual platforms out there, to bring their digital archive to life.

teamgbpinterest  pinterest-IG

 

 

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The Premier League 2013/14 Facebook Recap [infographic]


Little has been spoken about the Premier League in recent weeks as the World Cup hits our screens tonight with the opening ceremony followed by Brazil’s opening game against Croatia.

But analytics company Locowise have perked our attention with the release of an interesting infographic that gives a thorough breakdown, and a number of interesting stats about how our teams have been performing on Facebook.

It looks past the obvious stats, such as Manchester United having the biggest Facebook page – which has just passed 50m fans, a good 20m more than nearest rival Chelsea.  For example, did you know that Hull’s page fan base grew by an impressive 787% during the season? Or that there were 34,159 total posts made by all the clubs?

Take a look below at this and many more interesting stats from the season just past. How did your team perform?

epl_infographic2

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Liverpool FC release their Facebook World Cup predictions


Millions of fans around the world will watch the World Cup kick off on Thursday but just how far would your national team get if the outcome of the tournament was actually determined by how many followers each country has on LFC’s official Facebook page?

The Reds have used the little downtime they may have – this time of year is often the busiest for the non playing staff – to take a look at how the World Cup would play out just going on the representation of countries on their Facebook page.

It’s a fact that LFC boast more international Facebook pages and a higher engagement rate per follower than any other club in Europe with Thailand this year replacing Indonesia as Liverpool’s biggest country on the social media platform.

It’s a bit of fun as we prepare for tomorrow’s big kick off in Brazil. With so much hype leading up to it and a lack of football to take our minds of it since the end of the Premier League season we need a bit of light relief now and again.

It is interesting to look at the biggest groups on Liverpool’s Facebook page with England (obviously), Mexico, USA and Algeria being the top ones represented. This doesn’t take into account those whose nations aren’t in the World Cup, with Asia representing such a significant total.

It does give you a feel for the very diverse nature of the clubs fan base, and the great work that Paul Rogers and his team have been doing within the international markets. Wouldn’t we love it though if England really did win!

LFCFacebookWC

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FIFA Digital at the 2014 FIFA #WorldCup Brazil


It’s now less than a week until the 2014 World Cup starts in Brazil, as long as the stadiums are ready of course. The excitement you can feel has been building with the pre-WC friendly matches well underway and Panini stickers being swapped at a furious rate.

Last week I took a look at what a few of the brands had been doing in the build up to the world’s second biggest tournament (only the Olympics outdoes it in terms of audience). So this time I’m going to look at what FIFA itself has been doing when it comes to digital.

The primary destinations for fans will be FIFA.com, m.fifa.com (the newly revamped app which has encountered some issues), Facebook and Twitter. No big surprises with the social channels chosen, so no place for the likes of Google+, YouTube or WhatsApp at the moment – concentrating on doing a few well is always better than doing too much just for the sake of it.

The video content is being housed on FIFA.com as they look to keep their quality content on an area they have most control and also links to their sponsors and other digital platforms. This is also true with the Live Blog from Brazil, with a key element being the embedding of tweets and Facebook posts from fans, stakeholders, media and key influencers. Live blogging is something we’ve seen grow massively with the European Tour, Man City, Premier League and many others taking advantage of it.

The big new activation for FIFA is ‘Global Stadium’, a concept we covered here only a few days ago when it was launched.  Their aim is to unite fans from around the world and capture the excitement and spirit of the World Cup. Fans can #JoinIn and are able to;

  • Follow the match through the Live Blog and stats
  • See social posts from players, coaches and celebrities and interact with their own friend’s posts
  • Discuss the game as it happens with a worldwide audience
  • Get involved in a variety of exclusive activities such as winning the actual kick-off ball from that game and voting for their Man of the Match

On Facebook and Twitter they have stated that their core content aims fall under 5 sub-headings; Football, Fans, Facilitation, Fun and FIFA. In simple terms, covering everything on the pitch; engaging fans in fun, interactive contests and asking them to share THEIR content; showcasing some of FIFA’s core programmes and initiatives; and facilitating the journey of fans and media, by providing regular, up-to-date, relevant information.

Facebook

FIFA’s first Facebook page was launched in June 2013 to coincide with the FIFA Confederations Cup. Twelve pages are now live, with the FIFA World Cup page now having over 19 million fans worldwide. The content is image driven. Photos, videos, trivia questions, exclusive interviews, fan promotions in the FIFA online store, news on the launch of ticket sales phases, and the promotion of fun fan games, such as
the Online Panini album aim to provide a variety of content.

FIFA’s extensive archive also enables us to take a look back at the stars of the past. Working together with FIFA’s Partners, they are also able to tell the story of unique opportunities provided at every FIFA competition, for example, through the FIFA Youth Programme, for children to get a birds-eye view, by being a player escort or being part of the ball crew.

In April 2014, eight out of the ten fastest-growing sports pages on Facebook belonged to FIFA, and at the beginning of May 2014, FIFA merged its two World Cup Facebook pages – one historic; one focused on Brazil 2014, to create one central World Cup hub.

Twitter

FIFA’s presence on Twitter went live in mid-2010. There are accounts for FIFA (@fifacom) and @FIFAWorldCup in six languages, for the FIFA President and the FIFA Secretary General, as well as accounts for the FIFA Media Department (@FIFAMedia) and women’s football (@FIFAWWC).

The platform provides a personal and direct communication channel with fans, media, stakeholders and key influencers. Hashtags are used for FIFA’s tournaments to create discussion topics, regular interactive daily polls/Q&As are posted
to ask fans for their views on the ‘key topics of the day’ and wherever possible, breaking news is posted to ensure FIFA’s authentic message is relayed in real-time.

Overall, there are more than seven million followers across FIFA’s accounts. The platform was used for the official man of the match vote during FIFA Confederations Cup 2013 and will once again be utilised for the 2014 FIFA World Cup Brazil™, in an innovative activation together with Anheuser-Busch & Twitter. Fans will also be able to cast their Man of the Match vote on Twitter, across FIFA’s six @fifacom and six
@fifaworldcup language accounts, while votes will also be counted from FIFA.com too.

Hashtags

FIFA Digital will be using the following hashtags in six languages: #WorldCup, #Joinin, #GlobalStadium while each match will have its own hashtag too.

Monitoring

In order to measure effectiveness and better tailor content to our fans, FIFA utilises a variety of reporting/monitoring tools for real-time analytics. We will also be working together with social media platforms to provide key data, both as part of our daily content, but also to Media through the daily news briefings at the 2014 FIFA World Cup. FIFA Digital will also produce a series of Infographics at key stages of the competition, to provide key digital highlights.

 

 

 

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You Stay Classy, Local Sports Team


By Hash Piperdy. In 32 months as a rugby writer on social media, Hash Piperdy has seen several changes in the way sports and social media collide. He is moving on to join a football organisation in mid-May. You can follow his thoughts at @codenamehash orhttp://passinterference.wordpress.com while he prays for the Jets to one day, win the Superbowl.

One of the most difficult and common things to manage on social media is almost constant abuse. Defeats breed negativity, attracting comments from trolls and fans alike. In a heated situation, you might feel that you can’t write anything without being assaulted by a selection of memes, snarky comments and abuse – want some extra stress? Try and hold a Q&A with one of the players.

And that abuse is from fans, what if other professional outfits join in?

Part of social media 101 is to establish a unique tone of voice, one that is recognisable and cuts through all the other sides that exist in your league, your city, your sport. The LA Kings are one such side that has gone, to paraphrase a wrestling term, full heel.

https://twitter.com/LAKings/statuses/192303694597996544

Talking to other teams, responding back to other fans in a way that is more than “thanks for your tweet” and knifing through a ridiculously crowded sports marketplace and acting as the witty, all-seeing eye sitting next to you in the stands is a fantastic concept, but only a few teams have managed to do this successfully. In a city with (deep breath) the Lakers, Clippers, Galaxy, Angels, Ducks, Dodgers, Trojans and Chivas, ask yourself whether the same style of social would work if they were a bigger team in the same market.

However, going full heel has consequences. Beyond setting yourself and your team up for a fall, you’re going to attract unwanted attention with fans of other sides branding you classless at best and at worst, something unmentionable – even if your reactive posts are accidental.

Tottenham Hotspur attracted significant attention across social media when their official Twitter account posted a (now deleted) Vine about Liverpool’s collapse against Crystal Palace. Whether it was from the wrong account or not, over 5,000 retweets meant that it was very difficult to get the toothpaste back into the tube. Spurs have since apologised and are investigating, but for many, it’s left a mark on their account, which they will have to work hard at removing over the summer.

It’s not just one dimensional abuse that can get you into trouble. I’m a massive stats fiend, and in my previous capacity as Social Media Manager for a rugby tournament, I pointed out that one side were nilled away from home against three of their rivals. My motivation for this was that it was a remarkable stat and one that would get people talking about the team, the league and what that side needed to do to break the slump. I received an email from the powers that be, via the mentioned team, instructing me to remove the tweet.

Despite fighting my corner, I was overruled. I still feel that presented in the right (i.e. not gloating) way, negative stats about one of your sides can act as a spark for conversation while boosting the integrity of the competition, as it shows that the competition isn’t afraid to highlight these things.

America seems to be a bit more open to this. Consider this tweet:

https://twitter.com/MoveTheSticks/status/379647187694534656

This was retweeted over 435 times, including by the @NFL themselves. The Jaguars didn’t seem to have much of an issue with this stat, or that the tweet was broadcast by the league, but they did get involved when the Denver Broncos took a shot at them ahead of their clash:

https://twitter.com/jaguars/status/387229936232058880

I don’t see too much of an issue with this. It’s not a team taking an unnecessary shot at another, but it’s actually quite measured from Denver. The response from the Jaguars is also quite elegant, choosing the high road. This endeared me a little to the Jags, and while they still got beaten, seeing the teams talk to each other on social media was a nice touch, especially in a league which is seen as one of the most intense in the world.

It is possible to be the bad guy on social media when representing a team, but it’s important to use it sparingly and at the right time. As with everything else, judge the room when you walk in, just remember that this room is a lot larger and reactionary than almost any other.

 

 

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West Ham United launch their first “Social Media Match”


Tonight West Ham United take on Hull City in the Premier League.  Now a mid-table clash between two teams who have hit some reasonable form as we head into the business end of the season.

The game at Upton Park has been picked out by the home club as an opportunity to really push what they do when it comes to engaging with fans through social media.  Most teams will launch one or two new initiatives, but not West Ham.  They have gone all-out for this one and there is a huge amount going on across Twitter, Facebook and YouTube.

There is action happening pre-match, during it and post-match! This is all aimed at activating the clubs 900,000+ followers across all their social media platforms (and presumably building on this number too).  It’s already gained coverage in the Metro, with whom it has a strong relationship and fans have been discussing it on forums, in fanzines and across social media platforms.

West Ham’s Media Officer (Digital), Leo Tyrie, explained to us the thinking behind the idea…

“As a Club West Ham United are always looking for new and exciting ways to engage with our fanbase and the idea of theming a match around our social media output made perfect sense for us.

Our numbers across Twitter and Facebook have steadily climbed over the past couple of years, while we have recently developed our output further across Instagram, Google+ and YouTube.

We want our supporters to feel as involved in the matchday experience as possible and we’re looking forward to showcasting their – and our – content around the match against Hull.”

Below is the exhaustive list of what has been going on, and also what will be happening during the day. I’m wondering if there will be any new Vines after the media team came along to our Digital Sport London event on Monday night, perhaps doing some last minute research! (They were mentioned as an example of best use of the tool during the event – well done Leo and your team).

 

Pre-match

 

#HammerShirts - The club asked fans to  Tweet them with messages of support for the team. The best 20 messages will be printed on T-shirts and worn by the players during their pre-match warm-up. The players will sign their own T-shirt, which will be sent to the fan who Tweeted their message. These messages will also appear in the Official Programme on matchday.

• Phoenix from the Flames - Fans were also asked to submit videos of them recreating your favourite West Ham United moment from the 2013/14 season! The winning entry or entries will be broadcast on the big screens before kick-off and on the Club’s Official YouTube channel.

The final piece of pre-match engagement was to conduct the main interview with Mohamed Diame in the Official Programme. Fans had to submit their questions for Mo on their Twitter page @whufc_official using the hashtage #AskMo

 

Matchday

 

#Gloveaway - Goalkeeper Adrian will be leaving one of his gloves at a mystery east London location, which he will announce at 12noon on matchday on his Twitter page @AdriSanMiguel. The first fan to find Adrian’s glove will be given two tickets to the game (if required) and get to meet Adrian. (Similar to the Treasure Hunt run by Nottingham Forest recently)

• Competitions - There will be the chance to win a piece of signed memorabilia by entering their matchday starting XI prediction competition on Twitter using the hashtag #WHULINEUP and by predicting West Ham’s first goalscorer using #WHUGOAL

• #HammersPlaylist - Tweet your favourite song to be part of the matchday playlist at half-time. West Ham will create a ten-song shortlist, with the top three songs voted by fans on @whufc_official making the half-time playlist over the PA system. To nominate your ONE song for the Hammers Playlist, fans can do so now using the hashtag #HammersPlaylist

• Matchday coverage - Their multimedia team will be following the players around the Boleyn Ground on matchday, with regular videos being published on the Club’s official YouTube channel.

• #MattsMatchday - Midfielder Matt Taylor will Tweet his matchday from start to finish on his Twitter page @Official_MattT using the hashtag #MattsMatchday

 

During the action

 

• Player pundit - The club will be asking a first-team player (subject to availability) to join them in the Press Box to give his expert opinion on the action during the game on our official Twitter page @whufc_official

#HammerTimeDuring the game, they want fans to Tweet a photo from wherever they are watching the match, whether that be in the ground, at home or in a bar, on your own on with a group of fellow supporters using the hashtag #HammerTime. This will be interesting with the lack of 3G generally available at grounds – will any fans be able to do so during game time?

Matchday coverageSharing the very best images from in and around the Boleyn Ground all matchday, including action photos, in a gallery on their official Facebook page.

 

Post-match

 

Man of the Match - Launching live Man of the Match vote immediately after the final whistle on the official Twitter page. The player with the most RT wins Man of the Match, with one of the fans who voted for him winning a signed prize.

 

It’s a pretty extensive list of activity – the West Ham media team are certainly going to be VERY busy for the rest of today!  Good luck to Leo and the team down at Upton Park. Hopefully we’ll follow it up with a chat with them about how it went and what their plans are going forward.

 

West Ham Mo Diame

 

 

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#Sochi2014 on Social Media: Hot Numbers. Cool Conversations. All Yours


Last week the IOC released figures from around the Winter Olympics held in Russia to give a picture as to what was happening in the world of social media.

The IOC tracked activity on the Olympic Athlete’s Hub, their social media platform that combines feeds from more than 6,000 Olympians across Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and Russian speaking platform VKontakte (UK).

More than 2 million new fans joined the Olympic Facebook page during the Games and their Twitter grew by an extra 168k followers.  The official Instagram account was almost as high with 150k new followers.

Some of the other interesting highlights they picked out include;

  • The US was the most active team with 22,598 new posts logged during the Games!  That’s seriously some going!  Canada (15,716) and Team GB (9,867) were the next closest, some distance behind.
  • The busiest days were 7Th Feb, the Opening Ceremony, and 8th Feb when the figure skating and women’s free style skiing moguls were taking place.  This is interesting especially considering the interest in ice hockey especially in all the biggest countries (US, Canada, Russia).
  • After on year on VK, the official Olympic account amassed 2.8m fans to become the most popular official community on the platform.  There were more than 54m mentions of the Olympics on VK , an average of 1.5m per day. 10m came in the Opening Ceremony and 25m on the Closing Ceremony.

“Russia has had its first social media Olympics, and for the IOC it is important to engage and connect with the home team. The Games have come to an end, but the social legacy lives on as we want to keep connecting with our millions of new Russian fans, telling them about the Youth Olympic Games and of course Rio 2016 – the host city of the next Summer Olympics.” - IOC Director of Communications Mark Adams

Below is the infographic produced by the IOC to celebrate the end of the Games and give us an insight into what was happening on social media in that time.

 

Hub-infographi_600

 

 

Posted in Olympics, Research, Social MediaComments (0)

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