Tag Archive | "digital sport"

Wimbledon 2014: A Digital Review


At the last Digital Sport London event we were lucky enough to have with us Wimbledon’s Content & Communication Manager Alexandra Willis. Alexandra spoke last year at our half day London event so it was interesting to hear their plans for this year and how they turned out.

Just before this years Championship I interviewed Alexandra for the website to get some early insights into what they had in store for us (you can read the full interview here) and the interest in what they were doing was obvious from the attention the article received. So an audience of around 70 people listened intently to what Alex had to say on stage at Riley’s Sports Bar.

An award winning year, picking up ‘Brand of the Year’ at the BT Sport Industry Awards and ‘Best Technology Winner’ at the Sports Technology Awards, meant that they had a lot to live up to this time around. And if anyone tuned into any of the digital platforms this year you were not left disappointed.

Not only was there a new mobile app and an improved experience across iPad, the main website and using video. But they also managed to introduce new social media and digital activities to draw fans even closer to the action. Partnering with tech firm (and #DSLondon sponsor) Grabyo to release near real-time video clips was a great move.

As was the Social Media Command Centre (great for monitoring and content) and Hill v World (getting everyone involved both at the event and at home). This led to some impressive stats, all of which you can see in the presentation slides available below.

 

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4 Things We Learnt from the Glasgow 2014 Opening Ceremony


Guest Post: This article is from Brandwatch and published with their permission as part of the ongoing sponsorship of the Digital Sport London 2014 series.

The 2014 Commonwealth Games kicked off on Wednesday night with 4,950 athletes, 2,000 performers, 71 Scottie dogs and 1 awkward baton. As always, Twitter users were not shy in voicing their opinions with over a quarter of a million tweets posted during the ceremony.

So what can we learn from the abundance of data posted online last night?


1. Unicef Shone on the Global Stage

The link-up between Glasgow 2014 and Unicef was the first of its kind for the Games and has – so far – been an undeniable success.

£2.5million was raised in just one hour for the children’s charity, yet the recognition the brand gained may have been even more valuable.

Topics component

Unicef’s appeal was mentioned just over 20,000 times on the web – undeniably impressive.

Standing out during an event of this magnitude can be tough due to the huge amount of online chat, yet Unicef stayed top of most online trends.

To put this in context; the four other main sponsors for the Games received a total of just 2% of the mentions relating to sponsors, the other 97% was attributed towards Unicef.

Pie chart comparing sponsors

BP, Ford and Scottish and Southern Electric must do more to make to make the most out of their sponsorship.

@Unicef_UK tweeted live throughout the event sparking online conversation about their brand.

Whereas, @BP_plc@FordUK and @SSE did not live tweet and therefore lost out on a unique chance to raise brand awareness.

Virgin Media did tweet during the event but only via their second, less popular account@VMLoves.

So, we award Unicef with a gold medal for their committed social media presence last night!  Other sponsors still have time to raise awareness for their brand, but to do so they must commit themselves to the Commonwealth story.


2. Usain Bolt is as Popular as Ever

As most of you can imagine, Bolt’s arrival at the games dominated the athlete chatter on social media.

61% of the conversation was about the fastest man in the world, while 22% spoke about Bradley Wiggins.

Only a measly 10% mentioned Mo Farah – so a bad few days for the now injured long distance runner.

Bolt will hopefully light up our screens again this summer with some more of his record breaking displays.

With the track sport rife with doping bans, a clean and popular winner will help direct the sport back on track.


3. People Really Do Feel ‘Better in the Morning’

 

Interestingly for any sleep advocates out there, people became more positive about the opening ceremony once they’d had a good night’s kip.

sentiment comparison

Twitter users were also less likely to criticize the ceremony after resting.

Maybe the old age adage that ‘you’ll feel better in the morning’ has some tangible meaning behind it after all.


4. Rod is ‘Sailing’ ahead of Susan

Famed for having one of the most viewed YouTube videos of all time, Susan Boyle seems to have lost the spark that once made her so interesting to watch.

Rod Stewart had almost double the amount of mentions Susan Boyle received during the Commonwealth curtain raiser.

Comparing Susan to Rod

Despite both being on stage for a similar amount of time, Boyle’s appearance did not leave a lasting effect on journalists.

News articles this morning mentioned her performance only 60 times, whereas Rod Stewart’s performance was acclaimed over 140 times.

 

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The Hidden Value Of Vine


Guest Post: Tom Kelk is a tech/sport blogger and Senior Social Exec at communications agency, Pitch. You can find him on Twitter (@TomKelk), LinkedIn and his blog

Was I the only one who looked through the Loops of my own account to be pleasantly surprised by the number of Loops I’d received on my personal channel? I’ve only put out 15 Vines, but these have been watched over 230,000 times.

This intrigued me on two counts, if I’ve amassed over 230,000 Loops, what have brands generated? And secondly, what do these Loops show? Is Vine actually providing more value to brands than we’ve thought?

First off, Vine is part of the digital strategy of many brands, but it’s not central to it. It’s a subsidiary. That’s not going to change, but looking at how brands are racking up thousands of Loops within a short space of time, Vine might just be a more central aspect of brand strategies. The numbers are particularly impressive.

Brands like Ford EU and Charmin have racked up over 20m Loops between them. Both of their YouTube channels combined total 34m views. So the results on Vine are not too shabby given the dramatic disparity between the cost of generating YouTube video compared to six seconds of Vine! If we break this down, Charmin attracted 8m Loops from 67 Vines, an average of 119,000 per Vine.

On YouTube, they’ve seen 159,000 views per video. It’s not far off. It’s even more apparent with Ford EU, who generated 12m views of 47 videos, averaging 255,000 Loops per Vine. Compare this to YouTube, where Ford EU has managed 29,673 views per video. Consider this greater deal of production cost, you’d have to argue that Vine is providing quite the value for Ford EU.

Then there are those putting more effort into Vine, including post-production uploading, like Nike Football. They’ve amassed over 19m Loops on their own through 14 Vines – that’s an average of over 1.35m Loops per Vine! Let’s say, for argument sake, that an individual watches a Vine three times (probably closer to two but go with it), that means around 5.5m people have potentially viewed Nike’s content on Vine.

With Nike so reliant on time with their ambassadors for content, the opportunity to create a series of Vines in their time with an asset, as opposed to one or two glossy YouTube edits, is an attractive option. Worth the investment? I think so.

Following on from these total numbers, there’s the added bonus of the watching of a Vine several times repeated. It begs the question, when watched three times, is the penetration of simple, condensed messaging, greater than a three-minute long YouTube video?

There are obviously pieces of content that need to be hosted on either channel through necessity, and it’s clearly not as black and white as the numbers suggest, but it could be worth a study, right?

Please excuse the crude analytics, but they simply illustrate the potential in Vine if executed correctly. Many brands will have Vine as a part of their digital strategy, but perhaps it’s time for a little bit more of that YouTube budget to be reallocated into creating Vines.

Back in April last year, I wrote about how brands should be taking Vine more seriously, and whilst it is evolving, it’s been painfully slow with brands. Maybe, with quantifiable metrics, we might just see that investment.

 

loops

 

 

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#DSLondon 10 with The Football League & Wimbledon [event]


Thank you to everyone who took time out to come along to last month’s successful Digital Sport London looking at the use of analytics and data in sport. Tomorrow night (23rd July) we’re taking a broader look at digital sport with insights into two different sports from those who work directly in it.

The venue has changed this month as we move back to Rileys Sports Bar (Haymarket) in the centre of London. Back in January 2013 we held a very successful event at the venue with the ever engaging Richard Ayers. Hopefully we will be back at this venue on a regular basis over the coming months.

Firstly we’ll be chatting to Russell Scott who looks after the digital team at The Football League. He’s been in the role for around a year now and has made some significant changes to both the internal set up of the organisation to bring it into the modern age and also externally with new mobile sites, live blogging platforms and training for the 90 football clubs who are part of Football league Interactive. Not to mention a revamp of their own digital channels and content to fill them.

I will be chatting to Russell and also give time for people to ask questions from the audience or on Twitter. You can also leave a question in the comment box at the bottom of this post if you’d like to do it that way too.

Following a drinks break (very important in sport) we’ll be hearing from Alexandra Willis. She will be taking us through the digital activities they employed at last month’s Wimbledon to engage with fans in ever more interesting and in-depth ways, both those within the grounds and others who are watching/keeping up to date around the world.

Again there will be opportunities to ask Alex questions and tap into her knowledge. I will be putting a few questions to her and, as with Russell, there are a number of ways in which you can get involved.

Thank you to our series sponsors; Brandwatch, Grabyo and Rawnet. Both Brandwatch and Grabyo will be demonstrating their products at the event so be sure to say hi and find out more about what they do and how they can potentially help your business (or clients).

There are over 50 people already signed up, so there is plenty of networking to be done over a couple of mid week drinks. Join us from 6pm (first talk starts at 7pm) by visiting the link below to book your place…

 

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Interview: How the Open Championship is utilising iBeacons, Wi-Fi and storytelling


Tomorrow sees this year’s Open Golf Championship take place at Royal Liverpool. Starting on Thursday it sees the world’s top golfers, including Tiger Woods after a lengthly absence through injury, come to our shores for one of the most testing events on the golfing calendar.

Golf has been a sport that has embraced digital advances over the past few years, at the top end at least. You can find most players on Twitter (more so than Facebook) and each major event looks to engage with the thousands of fans who come through the gates, as well as the millions who tune in on TV.

Kevin Bain is the R&A’s Digital Manager who is based most of the time in the beautiful town of St. Andrews (the home my family originates from). Last week I was delighted that Kevin could take some time out of his hectic diary to speak to me about what their plans are for this years event.

Wi-Fi

One of the biggest investments that was trialled last year and is now being expanded upon is the installation of wifi points around the course. 350 access points have now been installed giving Wi-Fi coverage on every grandstand.

The test took place at Muirfield where the whole course had fibre optic cable installed with 200 access points. It was promoted in venue and allowed for video streaming as well as scoring and other information. It was 30k people use the facility with a peak of 3.5k concurrent users.

One of the most interesting findings was around usage – they expected video streaming to be the key driver but it turned out that GPS tracking of players on the course was the most used feature, showing who was teeing off from where and what their current score was.

iBeacons are another development which has been trialled in a small way before and are now being tested on a larger scale. In the US they are being utilised around many sports stadiums and they are proving to be a useful way in which to communicate with people around the course.

There will be a welcome message at the pay gate at the course and one of the incentives is being entered into a prize draw for tickets for next years Open. Certainly one that many keen golf fans attending will be open to. Also, at the 3rd hole there will trial messaging informing fans about which players are coming through. Something useful that will help them decide at which point they want to be to see they’re favourite players.

Social Media

#OpenMoments was launched one week out from the tournament. They started asking fans about what their favourite Open moments are and they will then use they’re archive of images and video’s to show fans those that have been most mentioned. More than 100 videos were ready to go when they launched.

They’re also been helping to promote the #OpenCountdown from the host course, Royal Liverpool, with both campaigns aimed at boosting awareness of the event and excitement amongst golf fans.

open moments

They are also working with a company I know well, Storystream. This new social wall will allow fans to see all the conversations in one place from players, fans and official accounts from the organisers. They’re are already some great images and videos available on there. So make sure you check out social.theopen.com 

If you’ve been in the Liverpool are you may well have seen a bus going around with advertising on it for the tournament. To win tickets to go to the golf all fans had to do if they spotted it was to tweet in a picture of it and use the hashtag #OpenBus to win.

There are also the more usual digital features for fans to use such as the Open app to get scores, radio commentary, video stream, etc. Plus you can find out everything you need to know across Facebook and Twitter. This year has seen another Twitter first for the event as they have launched a Japanese language feed. This helps them tap into the 3rd largest golf market in the world, behind the US and UK.

Thanks to Kevin for taking the time out to let us know about their plans. I’m lucky enough to be going this week to find out more about how it looks from behind-the-scenes. Look out for the tweets from @danielmclaren.

2013 open

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Formula E launches, complete with social media ‘Fanboost’ feature


Guest Post: Tom Kelk is a tech/sport blogger and Senior Social Exec at communications agency, Pitch. You can find him on Twitter (@TomKelk)

Formula E? Ring any bells? Well it will do – very soon. The Formula Electric series sparks off in Beijing in September and takes off around the world to destinations including Long Beach, LA, Punta del Esta and it finishes in Battersea Park, London.

It features global brands such a Virgin Racing, Audi, Amlin and more. Drivers like Jaime Alguersuari, Sam Bird, Bruno Senna and Lucas De Grassi are all taking part.

There’s much to be excited about the series – it’s street racing, it’s cutting-edge technology and it’s largely a step into the unknown. For us social media and digital geeks though, Formula E has opened something very exciting today and its called ‘Fanboost’.

During a Formula E race, each driver will get three ‘boosts’ that increase the power output of the car from 133kw to 200kw – certainly enough for an overtake. But here’s where it gets interesting. Fans can vote online for their favourite drivers, and the three drivers with the most votes receive one further 2.5 second boost. This means that fans can have a direct influence on the outcome of a race, which is hugely forward-thinking.

So how do users vote? Fans can vote at http://fanboost.fiaformulae.com from today as well as the Official Formula E Facebook, Twitter and SinaWeibo pages and via the official Formula E app, which launches on September 1.The three winners will be announced just 20 minutes before the start of the race.

Exciting concept and one that is sure to help the series take off! What do you think of the idea?

(*Disclosure: Tom works at Pitch Communications who work with Virgin Racing FE on the Formula E series.)

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Team GB launch interactive Pinterest Map showing history at the Olympic Games


Today, Team GB have launched an interactive Pinterest Map which looks at its entire history at the Olympic Games. In a really attractive looking activation they have come up with something that will fascinate fans in a really interactive way.

From Launceston Elliot in Athens 1896 to the men’s curling Silver at Sochi 2014 and all the medals won in-between, you can take a trip around the world and relive Team GB’s Olympic History: http://www.pinterest.com/teamgb/team-gbs-olympic-history/

The interactive map also features medal successes, Olympic Games logos and other top Team GB moments covering every Olympic Games from 1896 to 2014.  Pinterest forms part of Team GB’s social media strategy on the road to Rio 2016 as Team GB aim to engage with new audiences and fans.

Over the coming weeks Team GB will also roll out the historical timeline on its Facebook page, with one winter and summer Olympic Game being released each day. The timeline will feature as Facebook milestones and a photo album full of Team GB moments, stadium pictures and medal tallies.

When I recently ran a recent event looking at the World Cup in London, I asked Alex at FIFA if he had a question for the panel over Twitter. He asked what they thought FIFA could do better and more of, and the response was to utilise their massive World Cup archive.

That is just what Team GB are doing here and are using both Pinterest and Facebook to do this. Two of the most visual platforms out there, to bring their digital archive to life.

teamgbpinterest  pinterest-IG

 

 

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NBA and Google team up to bring fans Google Hangouts live during the NBA Draft


With the NBA season over, ending in dramatic fashion as underdogs San Antonio Spurs overcame LeBron James’ Miami Heat to take the NBA Championship in Game 5 of the NBA Finals, attention turns for every basketball fan to the NBA Draft.

Considered to be the most exciting draft since 1984, the year that the NBA welcomed Michael Jordan, Charles Barkley, John Stockton and first-pick Hakeem Olajuwon, 2014 is set to bring future legends into the league. To capitalise on this, the NBA are giving greater access to their fans, allowing them the opportunity to speak live with the top draft picks using Google+ Hangouts just moments after the players have been selected.

Giving fans exclusive access to some of the most exciting draft prospects in years – for basketball fans: Andrew Wiggins, Jabari Parker, Dante Exum, Aaron Gordon and Marcus Smart to name a few –is another step in showcasing the leading digital innovation of the NBA. Fans who hope to have their questions answered by one of the draft prospects can use #NBADraftCash.

As the NBA continues to extend their fan base worldwide, as shown by their Global Games programme which sees NBA teams play regular season games around the world as well as playing against local teams in each region, digital appears to be a vital component in their geographical expansion.

For UK fans, the chance of having a Hangout with your favourite new NBA players might be a little ambitious considering the time difference between Brooklyn and England, but can stay up to date with all things NBA and the Draft at @NBAUK and www.facebook.com/NBAUK.

 

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#DSLondon9: Data Driven Sport Event


Tomorrow sees the 9th edition of Digital Sport London take place at Old Street. Once again we’ll be taking up residence at The Bakery where we’ll be handing out free beers, giving you some insights into what happening on social media around the World Cup and listening to some of the leading players around the use of data in sport.

Through many discussions over the last year with various agencies, federations and clubs it’s become quite obvious that there is a massive amount of variation about how organisations use data, including social media data, to help them in their business.

It’s a topic that I’m very passionate about as I see campaigns and businesses struggle with using social media and measuring it’s impact and effectiveness.  A lot of course depends on the objectives of that campaign or general goals and how it all links into business objectives. It’s not just about likes, retweets and reach but insights into what that data means and what you can learn about your fans/customers.

To help guide us through the evening we’ll have contributions from;

Phil Stephan – Consultant @ Two Circles

Phil joined Two Circles from Chelsea where he was responsible for one of the most forward-thinking, data-driven and customer-led CRM strategies in the UK. Prior to that he lead the marketing team for the Southbank Centre, the world’s largest centre for the arts. Phil’s role at Two Circles involved leading much of their work in the area of data-driven customer engagement and revenue growth, as well as the development and innovation of their client offer.

Jamie Parsons – Sales Development (Sport) @ Brandwatch

Joining Brandwatch in 2014, Jamie is part of the Sales Development team. His main focus is the sports and gambling sector, which he feels has amazing potential for growth through the use of customer insight with social media monitoring.  Used by brands that include 30 of the Fortune 100, Brandwatch delivers a class leading social intelligence platform for companies across the globe.

Charlie Dundas – Business Development Director @ GMR Marketing

Charlie started his career in sports marketing at TWI (now IMG Media). Following this he spent 2 years at Sports & Outdoor Media in a front-line sales role bringing in revenue for rights holders in cricket, football and rugby, and then MediaCom with clients such as Snickers, Nokia, Akzo Nobel, Dell and VW on sponsorship strategy. Latterly, Charlie has spent 2 years at market leading sports and sponsorship research agency, Repucom, leading the UK market through a period of change following the acquisition of Sports Marketing Surveys, before moving to GMR Marketing to take up the role of Business Development Director.

 

If you are about earlier in the afternoon, we’ll be showing the Argentina v Nigeria final group game from 5pm where you join in playing along with Squawka’s new Battle Mode game for a bit of fun.

If not, we’ll be starting proceedings as usual with a 7pm first talk from myself and then Squawka CEO Sanjit Atwal. Sanjit will be talking about their findings into the use of second screen applications during the World Cup.

Join the likes of deltatre, Aqueduct, PRISM, Team GB, Perform Group, Bigballs Films, Fast Track, Northampton Saints and Stream UK for a fun and informative evening in East London. Places are still available for tomorrow’s event.

 

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Interview: How Wimbledon has become one of the most digital events in sport


This week I was lucky enough to have the opportunity to speak with Alexandra Willis. She is the Content and Communications Manager at the All England Lawn Tennis Club (AELTC) who look after Wimbledon. Meaning she is one busy lady at the moment!

The 2 week event starts on Monday with reigning champion Andy Murray number 3 seed, though probably not one of the favourites on 2014 form. The event has also been in the news with new initiatives with IBM and #DSLondon sponsor Grabyo. So what can we expect to see this year to keep fans engaged both at the event and watching from their homes?

To start with I asked Alexandra about the new IBM Social Media Command Centre, a platform that has been developed as a behind-the-scenes tool rather than publicly available. There are two main areas in which it will benefit both parties..

“It’s a great tool for IBM to use to monitor social buzz, enabling them to be able to balance their hosting requirements. So they know when to ramp it up when there is a rush of traffic and also scale down when things are a little quieter.  For us it’s about being able to see what the main topics people are talking about are and adjusting editorially. A good example would be Eugenie Bouchard in Australia when she reached the semi-finals – we can react and then tailor the content accordingly, making sure people people receive what they’re interested in at that particular time.”

But it’s not only from an editorial perspective that the Command Centre is helpful. They will also be able to see where people are tweeting from, who the influencers are, what are the trending topics and how people are responding to their posts, either positively or negatively. They’ve also made sure that they are screen grab-able so that they can fed into broadcast if needed and also enable them to produce a daily digest looking at who the buzz has been about.

Social Command Centre

Another big new move this year is the recent deal with real-time video sharing platform Grabyo. It’s not a new concept as both the US Open and Australian Open have done similar with recent Twitter acquisition SnappyTV, but it’s a really interesting one that fans will love.

“We were impressed by the capability to share video content in real-time. We’ve decided not to commercialise it and instead are putting our focus into ensuring it is the best fit possible for our output. We want to encourage people to tune into broadcast and engage with matches. We’ll be showing moments such as walk-ons, crowd reactions and funny moments rather than match highlights. We’re not competing with the broadcasters but complementing what they do and encouraging people to tune in.”

Another IBM/Wimbledon initiative that has gained the attention of many in the industry, especially following a launch event at the Apple Store in Covent Garden with Tim Henman last week. In previous years the technology has concentrated on interacting with fans who are not at the tournament. Now they want to bring those visiting the famous venue more into the fold.

This ‘Hill Vs World‘ idea has been born out of wanting to interact with all fans no matter where they are. Using the IBM Social Media Command Centre to power it, they will be asking fans questions throughout the tournament. The difference here is that fans on Henman Hill will be asked a question and a hashtag to respond. The same question will be asked on other platforms and in broadcast with another hashtag. Then they’ll compare the answers, a bit like a Twitter battle, pitching both sets of fans against each other.

Hill Vs World

One issue that tennis has to face every two years is a clash with major football tournaments, such as the World Cup. So I asked Alexandra how they deal with this. Do they just ignore it and go on as usual or embrace it?

“We’re not going to ignore the fact the World Cup is taking place, in fact quite the opposite. On Google Plus we’re running a fun campaign where we’re asking fans to send in their photos of where they’re watching Wimbledon. It doesn’t matter if you’re in Brazil for the football or anywhere else in the world. If we tried to ignore it then it would be counterproductive. It’s also interesting to see what impact second screen viewing will have and see if the World Cup actually has less of an impact than usual.”

Google Plus has long been a platform that has split opinion within the industry, not just in sport but digital as a whole. But it’s one that Wimbledon has embraced and seen them grow to above the 1m fan mark. So how did they achieve this?

“In 2013 we ran a competition where we asked fans to send in photos of them in their Wimbledon whites or showing the grass they were playing on. People really like the creative engagement and getting involved. Our success has been in sharing pictures, both our own and fans, and the link with YouTube is also strong. Tailoring content for specific platforms is important and I think fans appreciate that.”

So what else can we expect across the Wimbledon social media platforms? On Twitter they will have a Twitter Mirror installed in the queue and they’ll be asking people to get involved with a daily selfie competition. On Instagram they will be installing an ‘InstaBooth’ in the player’s lounge where the players will be giving their thoughts on how the day has gone and other behind-the-scenes info.

The ‘Live at Wimbledon’ shows will be back on YouTube. Providing daily content from every day of the competition with their studio set up and commentators giving fans alternative insights into the game. There may be a Google Hangout or two but the issue of player access means that this is hard to plan for.

Another interesting area for events such as Wimbledon is, what do you do to engage with fans and carry on using social media platforms for the other 50 weeks of the year?  It turns out to be one that is very much down to the event owners themselves and there is no set rule.

“This is where social media has proved to be really strong for us. People appreciate updates from around the year, whether it be the courts covered in snow or players turning up for a hit. Some of it is planned and some is done on the fly. We don’t know when a player might turn up but we do know when certain events are happening so we are able to plan for them.”

At the end of the tournament, all these activations and ideas will be looked at both internally and externally and everyone will have a view on whether it was a success. But what does success look like for Alexandra?

“Numbers are not so important to us. It’s more about engaging with fans and ensuring anyone who wants to follow the event can do so. The perception of the brand and ensuring that all fans have a good experience across all platforms is really important to us. Last year we saw almost 20m users across all devices, with over 50% coming from mobile devices. Although we’re expecting a bit of a dip this year due to the World Cup.”

Thanks to Alexandra for taking time out to speak with me during what must be one of the most hectic weeks of her year. You can follow Alexandra on @Alex_Willis and make sure you catch the tournament which starts on Monday!

YouTube Preview Image

 

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